As Mueller Investigation Has Become Politicized, Americans Are Split On Its Fairness

Americans are split on whether they think the Justice Department's Russia investigation is fair and are unsure of special counsel Robert Mueller, but they overwhelmingly believe he should be allowed to finish his investigation, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll . Fewer than half of Americans (48 percent) think the Russia probe has been fair, more than a quarter (28 percent) think it has not been and another quarter are unsure (23 percent). Just 29 percent of Americans had a...

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Aetna settled a lawsuit for $17 million Wednesday over a data breach that happened in the summer of 2017. The privacy of as many as 12,000 people insured by Aetna was compromised in a very low-tech way: the fact that they had been taking HIV drugs was revealed through the clear window of the envelope.

Rock Falls Chamber of Commerce

The Rock Falls Chamber of Commerce is creating what it calls “collectives” – business people with specialized needs who gather to learn and share pertinent information as well as connect with like-minded peers and the community.   

Bethany Bland, President and CEO of the Chamber, said the collectives are a response to a trend she and other staff were seeing.

"Car Insurance" by Flickr User Pictures of Money / (CC x 2.0)

Drivers in Illinois might soon have their auto insurance electronically verified in an effort to make sure every vehicle on the road is covered—but that requires a database the state doesn’t have yet.

An industry estimate shows about one out of every eight drivers has no insurance even though it’s required by law.

A judge has ordered the state of Illinois to expand the qualifying conditions for medical marijuana use to include intractable pain.

The order issued Tuesday by Cook County Circuit Judge Raymond Mitchell seeks to overturn a decision by the Illinois Department of Public Health rejecting pain that's resistant to treatment as a qualifier for medical marijuana use. Director Dr. Nirav Shah last year cited a “lack of high-quality data'' as a reason for denying a recommendation by the now-defunct Illinois Medical Cannabis Advisory Board for the decision.

flickr user / Michael Coghlan "Prison Bars" (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The measure Rauner signed Tuesday at Logan Correctional Center in Lincoln creates a women's division in the Illinois Department of Corrections with tailored programs and services.

A 2016 study encouraged Corrections' development of what Springfield Republican Rep. Tim Butler called Friday policies based on "gender-informed ... and trauma-informed decisions."

WNIJ/Victor Yehling

Rockford’s Sinnissippi Park is attracting teams of snow sculptors from across Illinois starting Wednesday. 

They're taking part in the 32nd Annual Illinois Snow Sculpting Competition. The Rockford Park District used snowmaking machines to ensure an adequate supply for competitors. They will have until Saturday to build the best sculpture they can out of a 6- by 6- by 10-foot block of snow.  Rockford Park District Spokeswoman Laura Gibbs-Green said teams’ tools are limited.

Hindu Prayer To Open General Assembly Session

Jan 16, 2018
State of Illinois

Each day of session in the General Assembly starts off with a prayer from a minister or chaplain. For the first time, a Hindu will be sharing a recitation from his religion.

Rajan Zed is the President of the Universal Society of Hinduism. He has prayed before government councils and groups all over the country.

When Zed appeared as a guest chaplain in the U.S. Senate, he was met by protest from a small group of Christian extremists.

Susan Stephens

The ground may be frozen in parts of Illinois, but it’s not too early to start thinking about this year's garden.

National Seed Swap Day is held the last Saturday of January.

These gatherings are a way for new and veteran green thumbs to expand their collections by sharing a variety of open-pollinated seeds. Pam Stock, with the Boone County Conservation District, is also an avid seed saver.

'Moneyball': The 2018 Illinois Governor's Race

Jan 16, 2018
BRIAN MACKEY AND KEITH COOPER / CC BY 2.0 / A DERIVATIVE OF MONEY / PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CARTER STALEY / NPR ILLINOIS

This year’s campaign pits a multimillionaire incumbent against a field that includes a multibillionaire in what could be the costliest governor's race in U.S. history.

The labels used in American politics to differentiate candidates today are fairly standard: Republican and Democrat. Moderate and radical. Establishment and anti-establishment.

But a new pair of labels is needed to fully consider Illinois' 2018 race for governor: haves and have-nots.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

This weekend, women will take to the streets in more than 300 cities worldwide. There are at least nine women’s marches scheduled in Illinois Saturday, including Chicago, Rockford, Carbondale, and a number of points in-between.

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News From NPR

With the death of biologist Mathilde Krim on Monday, at the age of 91 at her home in New York, the world lost a pioneering scientist, activist and fundraiser in AIDS research. She is being widely praised this week for her clarity, compassion and leadership.

Amid the panic, confusion and discrimination of the HIV epidemic's earliest days, Krim stood out — using science and straight talk, in the 1980s and beyond, to dispel fear, stigma, and misinformation among politicians and the public.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Aetna settled a lawsuit for $17 million Wednesday over a data breach that happened in the summer of 2017. The privacy of as many as 12,000 people insured by Aetna was compromised in a very low-tech way: the fact that they had been taking HIV drugs was revealed through the clear window of the envelope.

Lawmakers Demand Fast Internet For Rural Schools

1 hour ago

Nearly 90,000 students in schools across Illinois do not have access to high-speed internet, preventing them from participating in modern classroom activities like taking online tests or classes and browsing the internet.

Legislation announced Wednesday would set aside $16.3 million to help fund the installation of fiberoptic cables for high-speed internet in about 100 districts. The one-time state payment could be matched with roughly $47 million in federal funds.

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