PHOTOS: Scientists Take To Washington To Stress A Nonpartisan Agenda

Attendees from across the country descended on the nation's capital to speak up for science. The March for Science unfolded on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Saturday , and in multiple cities around the world. Coinciding with Earth Day, the event drew researchers, educators and scientifically-minded people. The event kicked off with open teaching sessions on the Mall, followed by a rally near the Washington Monument, and then a march that traveled to the U.S. Capitol building. NPR...

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Warehouse Workers for Justice

Isaura Martinez was working at a Bolingbrook factory when she felt a pull in her left wrist as she was attaching a metal hook to the back of a Christmas-card holder. Four years have passed, but the Cicero woman still feels pain after surgery to correct the issue. 

This week, a Winnebago County judge ordered a Rockford woman to spend up to 100 years in a mental health facility for the 2013 stabbing death of her son.

A judge earlier this year ruled Jody Kossow not guilty by reason of insanity after she stabbed her 12-year-old son Thomas more than 55 times, killing him.

She told 911 operators that “Satan was after me.”

The judge says Kossow must be confined to psychiatric care up to 100 years.

An Illinois State Board of Elections hearing officer is expected to issue a recommendation next month regarding allegations that the state's auditor general violated campaign finance disclosure laws while serving as a Democratic state representative.

  

Hours of testimony were heard Thursday on the issue of whether Frank Mautino's now-defunct campaign committee must update spending reports to provide additional details about how money was spent.

Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner says he no longer supports expanding abortion coverage for state workers and Medicaid recipients because it's too controversial, and Illinois needs to focus on other issues such as creating jobs.

"Courtroom One Gavel" by Flickr User Beth Cortez-Neavel / (CC BY 2.0)

A federal court has taken just three days to reject the appeal of imprisoned former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich seeking a third sentencing.

The unanimous ruling Friday by the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago dismissed arguments that the Democrat's trial-court judge should have reduced his 14-year prison term for corruption because of his good behavior behind bars.

The written opinion from the three-judge panel says, "Blagojevich's treatment of fellow inmates may show that, outside of office, he is an admirable person."

Lydia Urban Academy

A Rockford-based school-dropout recovery program has raised around $60,000 to stay open. 

The Lydia Urban Academy is a nonprofit program that helps 14- to 19-year-old students struggling with behavioral, social and learning deficiencies that make it difficult for them to succeed in a traditional school. Normally, Lydia recieves a large portion of its $200,000 annual budget from its parent organization, the Lydia Home Association.  However, the association told the Academy that there wasn't enough funding available to support the institution at the same level as in past years. 

State Sen. Daniel Biss wants to beat Bruce Rauner in next year’s gubernatorial election. 

However, the Evanston Democrat doesn’t blame all of the state’s problems on the Republican incumbent. At a Champaign event, he said the Democrats who came before Rauner didn't fix what he considers an unfair tax system. 

Updated at 8:05 p.m. ET

One police officer is dead and two seriously wounded after a shooting on Paris' famous Champs Elysees, in an incident that left one attacker dead. The assailant reportedly targeted a police vehicle. Authorities say a bystander was also wounded.

French prosecutor Francois Molins said the authorities have identified the shooter and are assessing whether the attacker had accomplices. Raids and searches were ongoing, Molins said.

Flickr user / alamosbasement "old school" (CC BY 2.0)

New information about Illinois senate Republicans’ school funding plan were revealed Wednesday.

One week after State Sen. Jason Barickman held a press conference to announce his own school funding plan, he filed two amendments totaling 500 pages. Barickman’s plan echoes many of the themes contained in a measure filed by his Democratic colleague Andy Manar but eliminates the block grant for Chicago Public Schools​.

His plan also offers school districts a choice about certain unfunded mandates. The two senators had tried previously to craft a bipartisan plan.

Former U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock has asked a judge to throw out the corruption case against him, arguing that authorities misinterpreted the law and overreached.

Lawyers for the Illinois Republican filed the motion to dismiss the case Thursday in a Springfield federal court. Among their other arguments is that the indictment "trespasses on land the Constitution reserves for Congress."

Prosecutors have denied that investigators overstepped legal lines by recruiting a confidential informant from Schock's staff as they built their case against him.

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News From NPR

With student debt at a staggering $1.3 trillion, many families are facing a huge financial dilemma: their final springtime decisions about college enrollment and acceptance. The NPR Ed team teamed up with Weekend Edition to answer some listener questions about debt and degrees.

Waiting on the numbers

Marcy, from Union City, N.J. has twin girls going off to college in September.

Can all hope be lost?

I used to think not.

I used to think that no matter how tough life gets for people, they always have hope to cling to – to get them through it.

Then I met some Rohingya refugees on a trip to Bangladesh last month. Reporter Michael Sullivan and I were there to report on the latest wave of the Muslim minority group to flee over the border from Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

With any new president, there's a learning curve. But for President Trump, it's been steeper than others.

"Mount Everest" is how Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, described it ahead of Trump's 100th day in office, which is coming up Saturday, April 29. "It's as steep as they come and ice-covered, and he didn't bring very many knowledgeable Sherpas with him."

Nasir Abdullahi is sitting in a mall in downtown Abuja, sipping fresh juice and eating plantain chips. Small, distinguished with an embroidered cap, Nasir looks like your typical Northern Nigerian businessman, but he's also a farmer.

A few years ago he got a call from an employee on his millet farm in Jigawa, Nigeria.

"He was even crying when he called me," Abdullahi says. "I said, 'Talk!' He said, 'There is something serious, there is something serious!' I said, 'Did anybody die? What is it?' He said, 'No, it's cattle herdsmen.'"

His Teacher Told Him He Wouldn't Go To College, Then He Did

1 hour ago

One day Ronnie Sidney, from Tappahannock, Va., was goofing off with his classmates in math when one of them threw a football at the board — and it landed a little too close to the teacher. Sidney says the ninth-grade teacher, visibly frustrated, turned around and said, " 'None of you are going to college.' "

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