Homeland Security Outlines New Rules To Tighten Enforcement Of Immigration Law

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly unveiled new policies on Tuesday that are aimed at detaining and deporting more immigrants in the U.S. illegally. The two memos , signed by Kelly, lay out a series of steps the department plans to take to implement President Donald Trump's executive orders from late January. Those orders called for increased border security and better enforcement of the nation's immigration laws. While the new policies call for a "surge" in the deployment of immigration...

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"old gym locker room" by Flickr user Charles Kremenak / (CC X 2.0)

Student enrollment has been trending down at Western Illinois University for much of the last decade. For the first time this century, there are fewer than 10,000 students enrolled at Western.

Dr. Ron Williams is the interim vice president for student services at Western. He says there about 629 fewer students this semester compared to last spring. 

He says that’s a loss of about 6.5 percent.

"Money" By Flickr User Pictures of Money / (CC BY 2.0)

It’s the latest consequence of Illinois’ 20-month budget stalemate.

The money in question comes from taxes on gasoline, phone bills, and gambling. It's collected by the state and passed along to local governments — that is, unless the powers that be never agree on a budget.

“In my city, we had several — numerous projects that had to be stopped."

Mark Eckert, mayor of Belleville, describes the early day of the impasse, when Illinois fell months behind on the payments. He says that affected not only construction jobs.

"Pages" by Flickr User Toshiyuki IMAI / (CC X 2.0)

McHenry County prosecutors say they won't file criminal charges against a student who circulated racist pamphlets in school.

The Daily Herald in Arlington Heights reports the decision not to prosecute the Huntley High School student was made despite officials finding the pamphlet's content "disgraceful and purveying a message that is unacceptable in this community."

The so-called Islamic State's financial fortunes are bound to the amount of territory it controls.

And the group's dramatic loss of ground in its strongholds in Syria and Iraq is putting pressure on its finances, according to a new report from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation.

Illinois State University is asking the public to weigh in on the institution's future.

The (Bloomington) Pantagraph reports the school is asking for community input on the challenges ISU is facing and what the university should look like in 15 to 20 years. People are invited to complete a survey online by Feb. 24.

The university is updating its strategic plan. It's the fourth update since the plan was first approved in 2000.

U.S. Representative Adam Kinzinger is working on a bill that would expand the Abraham Lincoln National Heritage Area to portions of the WNIJ listening area.

One of these areas is Freeport.  It's well-known as the site of the second Lincoln-Douglas debate, with a statuary park and other exhibits commemorating the event.

Freeport Convention and Visitors Bureau Director Connie Sorn says it’s also where Douglas formed the Freeport Doctrine. This claimed that states could pass laws for or against slavery, regardless of Supreme Court decisions.

Many men over 65 with low testosterone levels say their sense of well-being, not to mention sexual function, isn't what it used to be.

That's why some doctors prescribe testosterone replacement. But the effectiveness of testosterone has been controversial. Studies of the risks and benefits have been mixed, and the Food and Drug Administration beefed up its warnings about cardiac side effects of testosterone supplementation in 2015.

Dan Stroud / Flickr.com/dstroud (cc-by-nc)

A group of Illinois lawmakers are pushing an agenda intended to help farmers who sell at local markets.

Their legislation covers a variety of issues. One bill would set uniform fees and sanitation requirements at farmers markets across the state.

Lindsay Record, director of the Illinois Stewardship Alliance, says more people are going to farmers markets, but that isn't translating into better business.

“We actually received reports from across the states from farmers that sales are down," Record says. "So people are there, but maybe they aren’t purchasing.”

The League of Women Voters is hosting two candidate forums for the upcoming election in DeKalb. 

The first takes place Thursday and features municipal offices, such as aldermen in the 2nd, 4th and 6th Wards, DeKalb mayor, city clerk, and Afton Township highway commissioner.  

All these candidates will be on the ballot for the Feb. 28 consolidated primary election.  

Another event on February 28 will feature DeKalb school board candidates. 

Both forums will take place in the DeKalb Municipal Building and begin at 6:30 PM.  

Sycamore City Council Considers Capital Plan

12 hours ago

Sycamore’s city council examined a $14.3 million capital improvement plan for fiscal year 2018.

The Daily Chronicle reports about $10 million would go toward the third phase of construction for a wastewater treatment plant expansion.  The city slowly raised sewer rates since 2015 to pay for the improvements, but the current plans have dedicated revenue streams.

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News From NPR

The Polish-born conductor and composer Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, who led the Minnesota Orchestra for nearly two decades and worked with that symphony for well over 50 years in total, died Tuesday at age 93.

When the Academy Award nominations were announced in 2015 — and again in 2016 — there was swift backlash against the Academy for the lack of racial diversity among the nominees. Now, a new study of Best Picture nominees has revealed yet another demographic that's been chronically underrepresented in Hollywood — older people.

The human species is about to change dramatically. That's the argument Yuval Noah Harari makes in his new book, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow.

Harari is a history professor at Hebrew University in Israel. He tells NPR's Ari Shapiro that he expects we will soon engineer our bodies and minds in the same way we now design products.


Interview Highlights

On how we will begin to engineer bodies

The so-called Islamic State's financial fortunes are bound to the amount of territory it controls.

And the group's dramatic loss of ground in its strongholds in Syria and Iraq is putting pressure on its finances, according to a new report from the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation.

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