After A Year In Office, Questions About Trump's Foreign Deals Go On. And On

From the moment Donald Trump was elected president, questions started arising about his ability to separate his private business deals from his official duties. Critics became especially alarmed about his overseas holdings, fearing they could influence his foreign policy decisions. In the year since taking office, has he found ways to address the ethical questions that could taint his foreign policy credibility? Just before Inauguration Day on Jan. 20 2017, Trump tried to tackle the issues by...

Read More

DeKalb, IL – Politicians would like to think voters are well-informed when they step into the polling booths. But sometimes, people cast their vote based on the candidates stance on just one emotionally-charged issue. WNIJ's Susan Stephens wraps up our series on the candidates for U-S Senate with a look at where the Democrats stand on some of the hot-button issues.

DeKalb, IL – The Illinois House seat in the 70th district is up for grabs this fall. But before voters can decide on a candidate from the different parties, they'll have to pick a Republican next week. WNIJ's Simone Orendain has this profile of one of the Republicans, Joe Wiegand.

DeKalb, IL – The seven Democrats running for U-S differ on some issues. Each can cite different reasons why they are the one best suited to take on a Republican in the general election this fall. But the candidates largely agree on one issue: the way President Bush has handled the war in Iraq.

DeKalb, IL – Two DeKalb couty Republicans seek their party's nomination for State Representative in next week's primary. The 70th district includes all of DeKalb County, and parts of Ogle and LaSalle counties. Incumbent Bob Pritchard has held the job since last December. He was appointed to fill out the remainder of the term for the late State Representative David Wirsing. Now, Pritchard is being challenged by fellow Republican Joe Wiegand. Chris Lehman has this profile.

DeKalb, IL – The field of 15 candidates running for one of Illinois' U-S senate seats narrows down to two once this primary wraps up. You've seen the debates and lots of advertising. And with recent allegations of drug use and domestic problems... you thought you knew everything there was to know about them. But we dug a little deeper and asked them to share something about themselves that few people know. Simone Orendain has their responses.

DeKalb, IL – Polls show that voters in Illinois and nation-wide have one thing ontheir minds: jobs. It's no surprise that each candidate in the race for U.S. Senate has a plan to attract jobs to the state.

DeKalb, IL – The eight Republicans and seven Democrats running for U.S. Senate are trying to convince Illinois voters that they deserve to move on to the November election. We continue our look at the Democrats: WNIJ's Susan Stephens reports on the issues at the top of each candidate's list of priorities.

Sycamore, IL – Voters in the City of Sycamore will have the chance to cast a vote in favor of slowing the city's growth. A question is on the ballot in this month's primary. WNIJ's Chris Lehman reports:

DeKalb, IL – Illinois voters have just over a week left to decide who to vote for in the March 16th Primary. Last week we introduced you to the eight Republicans seeking their party's nomination for the U-S Senate. This week, we'll meet the seven Democrats seeking the office. Today, WNIJ's Chris Lehman asks each of the candidates why they've decided to seek the office.

DeKalb, IL – All this week, the Republicans running for one of Illinois' U.S. Senate seat shared their priorities and ideas about jobs, the war in Iraq, and national security. In our final installment of where the G.O.P. candidates stand, WNIJ's Simone Orendain covers the controversial issues.

Pages

News From NPR

In 1545, people in the Mexican highlands starting dying in enormous numbers. People infected with the disease bled and vomited before they died. Many had red spots on their skin.

It was one of the most devastating epidemics in human history. The 1545 outbreak, and a second wave in 1576, killed an estimated 7 million to 17 million people and contributed to the destruction of the Aztec Empire.

But identifying the pathogen responsible for the carnage has been difficult for scientists because infectious diseases leave behind very little archaeological evidence.

If President Donald Trump does not increase the federal minimum wage within the next two years, it will be more than ten years since its last increase — the longest that the federal minimum wage has remained unchanged since it was enacted. With the federal minimum wage stuck at $7.25, states and cities across the U.S. have increased their local minimum wages instead — some going as far as more than doubling the amount to $15 an hour.

Protesting Through Poetry

4 hours ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

01/15/2018: The cost of a dream

4 hours ago

(U.S. Edition) The closest the average person can get to hearing Dr. King’s iconic 1963 speech in full is reading it online or trekking to the Dr. King Center in Atlanta to buy a copy on DVD. The recording of the speech has been private property since he recited it, and everyone (with the exception of teachers) has to pay a licensing fee to listen. How do we weigh the value of this piece of American history? Plus, we discuss why homelessness is up for the first time since 2010 and take a look at the changing landscape of New Mexico's beloved chile industry.

Copyright 2018 WBAA Classical. To see more, visit WBAA Classical.

More News