Bogenberger Family Photo

Illinois High Court OKs Lawsuit In NIU Student's 2012 Death

The Illinois Supreme Court has ruled that the family of a Northern Illinois University fraternity pledge can proceed with a lawsuit involving his 2012 death from excessive drinking. The Daily-Chronicle reports the court Friday upheld a lower court ruling that David Bogenberger's family can't file a wrongful death lawsuit against the national chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha but they can sue the local chapter, its local members and local sorority women. A Cook County judge dismissed the family's...

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Rockford, IL – The Village of Maple Park is reeling after its mayor and eight others were arrested last Friday (May 28) on charges of taking part in an illegal gambling operation. Some in the village want to mayor to resign. But as WNIJ's Chris Lehman reports, many residents are upset that the state targeted their town.

St. Charles, IL – State lawmakers will have to approve a budget by the end of the month. As part of the governor's proposed cuts this year, the Illinois Department of Corrections budget will be 92-million dollars smaller. It plans to close two facilities to save. One of them is an Illinois Youth Center that some call a one of a kind facility. WNIJ's Simone Orendain reports.

Utica Tornado

May 19, 2004

Utica, IL – Eight people were killed by the tornado that swept through Utica on April 20th. Rescue teams using heavy equipment and shovels found the last of the victims in the rubble of a restaurant that collapsed: those who died were seeking refuge in the building's basement. WNIJ's Susan Stephens reports on how residents are beginning to cope.

Rockford, IL – Earlier this year, Sports Illustrated Magazine named Rockford the top sportstown in Illinois. But Sports Illustrated's senior contributing writer, Frank DeFord apparently had little to do with that designation. WNIJ's Chris Lehman spoke with Deford during his recent visit to the Forest City...

St. Charles, IL – A juvenile corrections facility in St. Charles could be around for just six more months, if the state decides to close it down. The move is part of the Department of Corrections' 92-million dollar cost savings plan. But opponents say there won't be any savings. WNIJ's Simone Orendain has the first part in a series about the Illinois Youth Center.

St. Charles, IL – The Illinois Department of Corrections will be working with a budget that's 92-million dollars less next year. It plans to close an Illinois Youth Center west of Chicago, as a cost saving measure. And this concerns families, employees, state lawmakers and the surrounding community. WNIJ's Simone Orendain has the third and final part of this series.

DeKalb, IL – Cavel International says its horse slaughterhouse in DeKalb will re-open soon. A fire took the facility offline two years ago. In the meantime, debate has heated up over whether horses should be killed for their meat. WNIJ's Chris Lehman spoke with two horse owners who stand on opposite sides of the issue.

Sycamore, IL – The bordering cities of DeKalb and Sycamore coexist peacefully. The two cities aren't just headed by mayors, they're run by managers. And both city managers say things weren't always peaceful when it came to economic interests. WNIJ's Simone Orendain reports.

Chicago, IL – A documentary on post-9/11 immigration follows the struggles of Pakistani immigrants in Chicago.

Beloit, Wisconsin – It's been nearly forty years since singer Arlo Guthrie was inspired to write "Alice's Restaurant." The long-monologue-of-a-song was a hit in the Woodstock-era, but don't expect him to play it if you see him in concert. WNIJ's Susan Stephens reports. (note: Arlo Guthrie performed at Beloit College on April 13th, 2004.)

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The Senate is set to hold a vote before midnight on Friday on the bill the House passed last night to avert a government shutdown. If it passes, the government will remain funded for the next four weeks.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

In 1971, Winnette Willis was a 23-year-old single mom in Chicago when she became pregnant again. "I was terrified of having another child," she tells Radio Diaries.

Before the Supreme Court's decision in Roe v. Wade 45 years ago, abortion was illegal in most of the United States, including in Illinois.

Women like Willis who wanted to terminate their pregnancies had limited and often frightening options. She wasn't sure what to do. And then one day, while she was waiting on an L train platform, she saw a sign.

01/19/2018: Shutdown countdown

3 hours ago

As we tape this, the United States government is hours away from grinding to a halt, barring a last-minute deal. The blame game is already starting, and that's where we'll start today's show. Then we'll look at lessons federal workers learned from the last shutdown. Plus, the latest on Amazon Prime, IBM and electric vehicle sales.

You can’t live in Lawrence Park, Pennsylvania, and not know General Electric. The company designed and built the entire community — the street grid, the houses — over a century ago.

Jim Connelly spent his childhood in the shadow of GE’s 350-acre facility near Erie. And eight years ago, after college and the military, he came home to Lawrence Park and joined the ranks.  

“I really admired that factory when I was growing up, wondering what they did inside the fence,” he said.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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