Election Chiefs 'Straddle The Line Between Sounding The Alarm And Being Alarmist'

Top election officials from across the country grappled with a delicate question this weekend: How do you tackle the threat of election interference, and be transparent in doing so, without further eroding the public's trust in the voting process? "I'm always trying to straddle the line between sounding the alarm on this issue and being alarmist," said Steve Simon, Minnesota's Secretary of State. The four-day annual meeting of the National Association of Secretaries of State, which featured a...

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Utica Tornado

May 19, 2004

Utica, IL – Eight people were killed by the tornado that swept through Utica on April 20th. Rescue teams using heavy equipment and shovels found the last of the victims in the rubble of a restaurant that collapsed: those who died were seeking refuge in the building's basement. WNIJ's Susan Stephens reports on how residents are beginning to cope.

Rockford, IL – Earlier this year, Sports Illustrated Magazine named Rockford the top sportstown in Illinois. But Sports Illustrated's senior contributing writer, Frank DeFord apparently had little to do with that designation. WNIJ's Chris Lehman spoke with Deford during his recent visit to the Forest City...

St. Charles, IL – A juvenile corrections facility in St. Charles could be around for just six more months, if the state decides to close it down. The move is part of the Department of Corrections' 92-million dollar cost savings plan. But opponents say there won't be any savings. WNIJ's Simone Orendain has the first part in a series about the Illinois Youth Center.

St. Charles, IL – The Illinois Department of Corrections will be working with a budget that's 92-million dollars less next year. It plans to close an Illinois Youth Center west of Chicago, as a cost saving measure. And this concerns families, employees, state lawmakers and the surrounding community. WNIJ's Simone Orendain has the third and final part of this series.

DeKalb, IL – Cavel International says its horse slaughterhouse in DeKalb will re-open soon. A fire took the facility offline two years ago. In the meantime, debate has heated up over whether horses should be killed for their meat. WNIJ's Chris Lehman spoke with two horse owners who stand on opposite sides of the issue.

Sycamore, IL – The bordering cities of DeKalb and Sycamore coexist peacefully. The two cities aren't just headed by mayors, they're run by managers. And both city managers say things weren't always peaceful when it came to economic interests. WNIJ's Simone Orendain reports.

Chicago, IL – A documentary on post-9/11 immigration follows the struggles of Pakistani immigrants in Chicago.

Beloit, Wisconsin – It's been nearly forty years since singer Arlo Guthrie was inspired to write "Alice's Restaurant." The long-monologue-of-a-song was a hit in the Woodstock-era, but don't expect him to play it if you see him in concert. WNIJ's Susan Stephens reports. (note: Arlo Guthrie performed at Beloit College on April 13th, 2004.)

DeKalb, Il – As the Baby Boom generation approaches retirement age, experts say cases of elder abuse could increase significantly. WNIJ's Chris Lehman reports...

Rockford, IL – A world-renowed classical guitar player is on tour and headed to Hawaii. She made a stop in Rockford and performed for people with AIDS and HIV. WNIJ's Simone Orendain reports.

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As the Senate tries to hash out a deal on immigration, it's not just immigrants that have a lot at stake. So do the businesses that hire them.

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On October 4, four American soldiers on patrol in the African country of Niger were killed in an ambush by terrorists affiliated with the Islamic State. The Pentagon promised a thorough investigation. That was months ago. And the story more or less disappeared from the public eye after that.

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