Lawsuit Says Migrants Subjected To Dirty Detention Facilities, Bad Food And Water

Migrants detained in recent months at the U.S.-Mexico border describe being held in Customs and Border Protection facilities that are unsanitary and overcrowded, receiving largely inedible food and being forced to drink foul-smelling drinking water. In a lawsuit filed against Attorney General Jeff Sessions by the Los Angeles-based Center for Human Rights & Constitutional Law , some 200 individuals detained under the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy were interviewed, many of them...

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DeKalb, IL – All this week, the Republicans running for one of Illinois' U.S. Senate seat shared their priorities and ideas about jobs, the war in Iraq, and national security. In our final installment of where the G.O.P. candidates stand, WNIJ's Simone Orendain covers the controversial issues.

DeKalb, IL – The war in Iraq and its aftermath are expected to play a large role in the Fall election. But the range of opinions is much more subtle between candidates in the primary election. In part four of our series on the Republican Senate candidates, WNIJ's Susan Stephens reports on where they stand on national security and rebuilding Iraq.

DeKalb, IL – Northern Illinois has lost thousands of manufacturing jobs over the past few years. The eight Republicans running for U-S Senate have a variety of ideas about how to reverse the trend. But as WNIJ's Chris Lehman reports, not all of the candidates are making promises.

DeKalb, IL – We begin a ten-part series on the issues in the U.S. Senate race and where the candidates stand on them. We start with the Republicans. WNIJ's Susan Stephens introduces us to the candidates, and they explain why they think they deserve to represent their party in the Fall Election.

DeKalb, IL – The eight Illinois Republicans running for U-S Senate told us why they want their party's nomination. Today, they're sharing their priorities.

DeKalb, IL – Singer-Piano player Marcia Ball loves Mardi Gras. No matter where she is on Fat Tuesday, the Louisiana native always finds a way to celebrate. WNIJ's Patrick Sheehan has more...

Chicago, IL – What do you do if you have a nationwide concert tour lined up, but no car to get you to your shows? If you're Andru Bemis, you hop a train. WNIJ's Chris Lehman has more:

Sycamore, IL – A watchdog group has been keeping tabs on the circuit court judges that hear domestic violence cases in DeKalb County. They recently unveiled the results in their first report.

Sycamore, IL – Jail officials are trying to keep the peace at the overcrowded DeKalb County Jail. They hope that this spring, voters will approve a sales tax increase to fund a planned expansion.

Carpentersville, IL – This academic year, the Carpentersville school district has a tight budget, smaller staff and fewer programs because a referendum failed last spring. A student films the effects of the change, and gets local reaction for a documentary he's producing.

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News From NPR

Less than 24 hours after proclaiming his "full faith and support for America's great intelligence agencies," President Trump contradicted those agencies once again.

Asked by reporters at the start of a Cabinet meeting if Russia is still targeting the U.S., Trump shook his head and answered "no."

That is counter to a warning issued by his director of National Intelligence, Dan Coats, who said last week that "the warning signs are there. The system is blinking," and that "today, the digital infrastructure that serves this country is literally under attack."

Tech entrepreneur Elon Musk has apologized for his part in a spat with a British diver who was involved in the rescue of 12 boys and their soccer coach in Thailand last week. Musk had tweeted a personal attack on Vern Unsworth after the diver dismissed Musk's offer of help with a vulgar comment.

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine has found urgent care centers are prescribing antibiotics to nearly half of patients with colds or the flu. The research from the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention used 2014 data from claims of people with employer-sponsored insurance younger than 65.  

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Ethiopia's "bird of peace" has landed.

After two decades of bloody conflict, Ethiopia and Eritrea have been repairing their relationship with remarkable speed following a peace deal reached last week. On Wednesday, a new milestone was marked — the first commercial flight between the neighboring countries in 20 years.

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