News

Week Of Testimony Begins In Andrew Rifkin Case

Dec 7, 2016
Katie Finlon / WNIJ

Thursday is the first day of several days of testimony in the case against a former Northern Illinois University police officer who was accused of sexual assault.

Court officials anticipate the trial of Andrew Rifkin taking about a week and including about ten witnesses. That includes the alleged victim’s former roommate, a digital forensics expert, and NIU health services personnel, according to court documents.

Comptroller Susana Mendoza says state employees promised bonuses will now have to wait to receive them during the ongoing budget impasse.

The office that controls Illinois' checkbook announced Wednesday that payments to social services and public safety come first.  

Mendoza, a Democrat, took office this week after ousting Republican Leslie Munger in a special election.

The issue of bonuses emerged during the campaign. In October, Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's office announced merit bonuses for over 1,000 non-union workers totaling up to $4 million.

ADP

A new report says Illinois added 8,600 private sector jobs in November. That’s a rebound after two months of much smaller increases.

The increase in the November ADP Regional Employment Report® comes after previous reports showing only 3,600 nonfarm private sector jobs were added in October and 2,100 in September.

Jimmy John's

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan says the Jimmy John's sandwich chain has agreed to stop requiring low-level employees to sign agreements preventing them from seeking jobs with competitors.

Madigan said Wednesday the Champaign-based chain also agreed to inform employees that previously signed agreements will not be enforced, tell franchise owners to rescind existing agreements and pay $100,000 to be used for public awareness of legal standards for non-compete agreements.

Madigan sued Jimmy John's in June.

Republican Governor Bruce Rauner and Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan may not agree on much when it comes to the Illinois budget.

But as they negotiate, both men apparently find it helpful to accuse the other of pushing for a tax increase.

Rauner, Madigan and the legislature’s other top leaders discussed the budget privately in Chicago.

After, Madigan said it will be difficult to pass any tax hike before a new crop of legislators are sworn in next month.

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