News

"You can take the girl out of the city, but you can't take the city out of the girl."

We've all heard this, which is why it's refreshing to find a story that shows the opposite.

Rachel Raines is the protagonist of Small Town Roads by L.B. Johnson, one of our Read With Me selections for this month.

"Asthma Inhaler" by Flickr User NIAID / (CC X 2.0)

School personnel across Illinois are adapting to a new state law that requires districts to have an emergency protocol to deal with asthma emergencies.

The Chicago Tribune reports that under the new law anyone who works with students must be trained to handle asthma emergencies. All children with asthma must have a written "asthma action plan" at the school as well. Gov. Bruce Rauner signed the legislation in August and it went into effect Jan. 1.

"Football helmet" by Flickr User Ramon Saroldi / (CC X 2.0)

Chicago sports franchises and national players' advocates are squaring off over whether injured professional athletes should be allowed to earn certain worker compensation benefits like other workers.

Current law allows Illinois residents to claim benefits that help make up the difference between what they would have earned before a career-ending injury and what they can make afterward, up to age 67.

Lawmakers are considering a proposal that would cut off former athletes at age 35 or five years after the injury.

www.cheribustos.com

Several months after first being mentioned as a possible candidate for governor of Illinois, Cheri Bustos has decided against it.

The congresswoman from East Moline and the 17th District Monday said she will run for re-election next year instead.

FACEBOOK/CLINTON AUTO AUCTION

Disparate entities say laws in this area need to change at the state and national levels.

The police took away a 70-year-old Moline woman’s car when her grandson drove it with a revoked license. “Why am I being punished?” Judy Wiese asked a reporter last year at the Rock Island County courthouse. After the story made headlines, a lawyer stepped forward and helped her out, pro bono — and the grandmother got her Jeep back.

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