Around the Nation
6:27 am
Mon December 19, 2011

High School Student Suspended For Tebowing

Tyler Carroll organized a kneel-down at his Long Island high school last week, and about 40 students participated. The superintendent called it a safety hazard because the Tebowing blocked the hallways. Carroll serves his suspension on Monday.

Asia
6:20 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Chinese React To Kim Jong Il's Death With Emoticons

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 6:22 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

We've been following the reaction this morning to the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il. The response of many Chinese is coming through in emoticons, symbols often used in text messages.

The Wall Street Journal reports Kim's death is the most popular topic on China's equivalent of Twitter. And among the more than million posts about him are many decorated with laughing emoticons and victory symbols. But just as many however show broken hearts and candles.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Business
3:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Favorite Social Media Tools For 2011

New websites make it easier for people to share not just thoughts, but things like music, photos, favorite recipes and magazine clips. Linda Wertheimer talks to Sree Sreenivasan, digital media professor and dean of student affairs at Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, about notable social media tools that cropped up in 2011.

Business
3:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Saudi Prince Buys Stake In Twitter

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 6:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a big investment in micro-blogging.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: The Saudi Arabian prince Alwaleed bin Talal is investing $300 million in Twitter. The man Time magazine calls the Arabian Warren Buffett says he looks to invest in, quote, "promising, high-growth businesses with a global impact," like Twitter.

Africa
3:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Libyan Militias Have 1 Day Left To Get Out Of Tripoli

The Libyan government has given armed groups until Tuesday to disarm and depart from the capital. But the deadline is unlikely to be met. It's indicative of the wider problem in Libya where anyone with a uniform and a gun can say they are in charge.

Analysis
3:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Politics In the News

Millions of Americans, who have benefited from a holiday in paying Social Security payroll taxes, cannot count on that being extended beyond the first of the year. House Speaker John Boehner said Sunday that the bipartisan deal worked out by the Senate to keep the tax cut going for another couple of months would not pass muster with House Republicans.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Fight Over Extending Payroll Tax Cut Flares Up Again

House Republicans are rejecting a bipartisan compromise approved overwhelmingly by the Senate Saturday. The deal would have extended the payroll tax holiday and unemployment benefits through February.

NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Former Child Soldier In Sudan Helps U.S. Exit Iraq

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 6:20 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

It's not clear how the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il will affect nuclear talks. Just ahead, we'll explore the concerns about the power transition in the secretive communist state.

Read more
NPR Story
3:00 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Former Czech President, Playwright Vaclav Havel Dies At 75

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 6:20 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

If there were a world leader who was the opposite of Kim Jong Il, it might have been former Czech President Vaclav Havel, a man who wanted to believe that truth and love must prevail over hate and lies. Havel died yesterday. He was 75.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Europe
2:29 am
Mon December 19, 2011

Era Of Socialist Leadership Ends In Spain

Spain's outgoing Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero (left) talks with Spain's incoming Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy before a meeting at the Moncloa Palace in Madrid on Friday.
Paul White AP

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 11:19 am

On March 11, 2004, al-Qaida-inspired bombers killed nearly 200 Madrid commuters on rush-hour trains. It was Europe's worst act of Islamist terrorism, and it came just three days before an election that Spain's conservatives were expected to win.

The government quickly blamed the attack on Basque separatists, but hours later, it became clear that it was Islamist militants.

"It got people mad about the government," says political scientist Jose Ignacio Wert.

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