Around the Nation
7:00 am
Sun December 4, 2011

Wash. Mine Cleanup Puts Retreat Center At Risk

Originally published on Sun December 4, 2011 9:13 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, to a tiny village here in the U.S. attempting to solve an environmental challenge. Nestled in the remote valley in Washington's Cascade Mountains, Holden Village is about to be flooded with hundreds of workers there to clean up the contaminated remains of an old copper mine.

Anna King, of the Northwest News Network, reports on what the cleanup will cost the town.

Read more
Environment
7:00 am
Sun December 4, 2011

Tough Work Lies Ahead In Climate Talks

In Durban, South Africa, thousands of men and women poured into the streets in front of the International Conference Center, where United Nations talks about climate change are taking place. Host Audie Cornish speaks with NPR's Richard Harris, who is at the conference.

Europe
5:17 am
Sun December 4, 2011

Curtain Could Fall On A Dazzling Arts Center In Spain

The Niemeyer Center for the arts will shut its doors on Dec. 15 after being open for only nine months in Aviles, Spain. It's a victim of political squabbling during difficult economic times.
Lauren Frayer for NPR

Originally published on Sun December 4, 2011 6:08 pm

In the boom years, Spain spent billions on big infrastructure projects — high-speed railways, roads and gleaming structures like the Niemeyer Center for the arts in Aviles, in the country's north.

Opened in March this year, the dazzling museum has hosted sold-out performances by Kevin Spacey and Woody Allen. But it's slated to close on Dec. 15, after barely nine months of operation, because of regional budget cuts.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:16 am
Sun December 4, 2011

Migrants Say They're Unwilling Mules For Cartels

A Border Patrol agent looks for footprints from illegal immigrants crossing the U.S.- Mexico border in 2010. Traffickers have begun using immigrants as drug smugglers, recruiting voluntarily and forcibly.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Sun December 4, 2011 6:06 pm

Mexican drug cartels have found a new source of labor to backpack marijuana into the United States: illegal immigrants.

Federal agents, prosecutors, defense attorneys and migrants themselves say that traffickers have begun recruiting undocumented immigrants at the border, both voluntarily and forcibly. Now, U.S. courts along the border have to decide what to do with terrified immigrants who come before them and say, "The cartel made me do it."

Read more
Environment
11:12 pm
Sat December 3, 2011

What's At Stake In South Africa Climate Talks?

South Africans light up a Baobab tree by riding bikes in Durban as part of a renewable energies display on the beach front during the United Nations Climate Change Conference.
Alexander Joe AFP/Getty Images

Representatives from 191 countries are meeting in Durban, South Africa, this week for United Nations climate change talks. One of the biggest questions is what will become of the Kyoto Protocol — a climate treaty signed in 1997. Key provisions of that expire next year and its future hangs in the balance. Another major question is whether nations can agree to a timeline that would lead to a new treaty that would include the world's biggest greenhouse-gas emitters, including the United States and China. The U.S.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:16 pm
Sat December 3, 2011

A Look Back: The Beginning Of The War In Iraq

A U.S. marine watches a statue of Saddam Hussein being toppled in Firdaus Square, in downtown Baghdad, on April 9, 2003.
Jerome Delay AP

Originally published on Sun December 4, 2011 5:30 am

December marks the beginning of the end of the U.S. war in Iraq.

The withdrawal has already begun as hundreds of U.S. troops are leaving Iraq every day; military vehicles, personnel and weapons are being shipped out of the country, and by Dec. 31, all U.S. troops will be gone after a conflict that started nearly a decade ago.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Sat December 3, 2011

Cain's Train Comes To A Stop

Originally published on Sat December 3, 2011 4:16 pm

In case you haven't heard yet:

Republican Herman Cain effectively ended his presidential campaign this afternoon, as the toll from allegations about sexual harassment and an affair (all of which he has denied) combined to effectively end his chances at getting the GOP nomination.

Here's how the story is playing:

-- "Campaign Over, Cain Vows To Go With 'Plan B'." (NPR.org)

Read more
Movie Interviews
3:58 pm
Sat December 3, 2011

Freud, Jung And What Went Wrong

A woman of some importance: Sabine Spielrein, one of Karl Jung's celebrated patients, later became a psychiatrist herself — and, as screenwriter Christopher Hampton tells NPR's Rachel Martin, an influence on both Jung and Sigmund Freud. Keira Knightley plays Spielrein in the new film A Dangerous Method.
Sony Pictures Classics

Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud are known as the fathers of psychoanalysis, but they focused on different things. Freud on the sexual underpinnings of — well, almost everything — and Jung for his mystical bent and dream theories.

For years, the two were close friends and collaborators but they had a falling out that ultimately ended their relationship. And turns out, there was a woman involved. Her name was Sabina Spielren.

The stories of all three are woven together in a new film called <em>A Dangerous Method.</em>

Read more
It's All Politics
3:44 pm
Sat December 3, 2011

5 'Lowlights' Of Herman Cain's Campaign

He added 9-9-9 to the national lexicon and slipped lyrics from a Pokemon movie into his stump speeches. Now that Herman Cain has suspended his presidential campaign, we look back at just a few of its most memorable — and excruciating — moments:

1. His brain freeze on Libya. His editorial meeting with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on Nov. 14 made for painful YouTube watching.

Read more
Author Interviews
3:40 pm
Sat December 3, 2011

The Doors Prove Strange Days Are Still With Us

The Doors, photographed in 1966.
Joel Brodsky Elektra Records

Originally published on Sat December 3, 2011 5:27 pm

To this day, Jim Morrison is one of the most significant frontmen to grace the rock stage. His band, The Doors, was unpredictable, mysterious, thrilling — even frightening.

In his new book,The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years, music writer Greil Marcus explores how the rock group came to define an era yet remain relevant today.

Read more

Pages