Religion
11:01 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

New Catholic Mass Already Causing A Stir

This weekend, the words and music of the English-language Mass will be different.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 6:33 am

This weekend, Catholics may experience a little surprise when they attend Mass. The words and music are different, thanks to the first major change of the English-language Mass in more than 40 years.

For many practicing Catholics, this will be a major adjustment.

So on a recent Sunday, the Rev. Chester Snyder of St. Joseph's church in Mechanicsburg, Pa., did a trial run through the new liturgy with his parishioners.

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StoryCorps' National Day Of Listening
11:01 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

English Teacher Reaches Through Student's Haze

John Burnett is an NPR correspondent based in Austin, Texas.
Steve Barrett for NPR

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 4:18 am

Christine Eastus was a double major in English and chemistry with plans to go to medical school. Instead — to the chagrin of her parents — she became a teacher.

In the 1970s, she taught English at Greenhill School in Addison, Texas.

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Michele Bachmann
11:01 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Bachmann's 'Conviction' To Fixing Government

Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann speaks during the Republican presidential debate on national security Tuesday in Washington, D.C.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

It wasn't long ago that Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann's rise to the top of the Republican field of presidential candidates was called "meteoric." In August, she won the Iowa straw poll. Now, she's polling in the single digits.

But Bachmann is plowing ahead with her campaign and this week she came out with a memoir, Core of Conviction. In it, she writes about her 28 children — five biological and 23 foster kids. She spent much of the 1990s as a stay-at-home mom.

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Law
11:01 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

From South Africa, Lessons In 'Soft Vengeance'

South African Constitutional Court Judge Albie Sachs, seen here in Johannesburg in 2009, resisted the impulse to take revenge on the bomber who cost him his right arm.
Denis Farrell AP

Sometimes in the life of a reporter, you meet a person so extraordinary, so interesting, that you want to share that experience with others. Such is the case with Albie Sachs, whom I met while on vacation in South Africa.

Sachs has led a remarkable life, moving from freedom fighter to founding father.

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The Record
11:01 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

New Holiday Songs: A Smart Career Move That's Fun, Too

A still from "I Want a Dog for Christmas, Charlie Brown!" which aired on ABC in 2001. Vince Guaraldi's rearrangements and originals for the A Charlie Brown Christmas soundtrack became holiday perennials.
ABC Photo Archives ABC via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 3:26 pm

Click the link above to hear Ann Powers and Frannie Kelley talk to Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep about the business and variety of Christmas music this year.

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World
4:12 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Egypt Military Rulers Reject Calls To Step Down

Egyptian women join a mass protest in Cairo's Tahrir square on November 24, 2011, as members of Egypt's ruling military council rejected calls to step down immediately, saying it would amount to a 'betrayal' as anti-military protests entered their seventh day.
Mahmud Hams Getty Images

Egypt's military rulers rejected protester demands for them to step down immediately and said Thursday they would start the first round of parliamentary elections on time next week, despite serious unrest in Cairo and other cities.

The ruling military council insisted it is not the same as the old regime it replaced, but the generals appear to be on much the same path that doomed Hosni Mubarak nine months ago, responding to the current crisis by delivering speeches seen as arrogant, mixing concessions with threats and using brutal force.

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Law
3:41 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

How Private Is Your Email? It Depends

Some big-name tech companies are asking Congress to step in and clarify Americans' online privacy rights.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 7:36 pm

Do the police need a warrant to read your email? Believe it or not, two decades into the Internet age, the answer to that question is still "maybe." It depends on how old the email is, where you keep it — and it even depends on whom you ask.

Some big-name tech companies are now asking Congress to step in and clarify Americans' online privacy rights.

If you do run afoul of the law and you happen to be one of the millions of people who use Gmail then cops will likely be directing their inquiries to the legal department at Google, in Mountain View, Calif.

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It's All Politics
3:40 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Romney's Religion Could Play Role In Primaries, Poll Finds

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks to a group of workers at Nationwide Insurance Company, Nov. 23, 2011, in Des Moines. A new poll suggests his religion could be an obstacle in the GOP primary.
Steve Pope AP

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 12:58 am

A new poll that gauges Americans' views of the Mormon faith served up difficult news for the nation's highest profile member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints: GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

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Europe
2:48 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Avoiding The Tax Man Could Cost Italians Dearly

As the European debt crisis drags on, one question being asked is what will happen to Italy. The new government of Prime Minister Mario Monti is struggling to convince the financial markets that the country has a plan to pay its debts. Among other things, Monti says he will do something about Italy's long tradition of tax evasion, which is considered somewhat of a national sport.

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David Greene is host of NPR's Morning Edition, with Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne.

For two years prior to taking on his current role in 2012, Greene was an NPR foreign correspondent based in Moscow covering the region from Ukraine and the Baltics, east to Siberia. During that time he brought listeners stories as wide ranging as Chernobyl 25 years later and Beatles-singing Russian Babushkas. He spent a month in Libya reporting riveting stories in the most difficult of circumstances as NATO bombs fell on Tripoli. He was honored with the 2011 Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize from WBUR and Boston University for that coverage of the Arab Spring.

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