National Security
6:21 am
Thu November 24, 2011

U.S. Easing Out Of Nation-Building Business

A U.S. Marine pushes a child on a swing in southern Afghanistan on March 4. After a decade of nation-building in Afghanistan, and nearly as long in Iraq, the U.S. appears to be losing it appetite for such efforts.
Adek Berry AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 4:12 pm

Nation-building has gone out of style.

The U.S. effort in Afghanistan has lasted a decade, and it's been nearly as long in Iraq. Now, there's little appetite in American political circles for large-scale attempts to build up the economies or political institutions of other countries.

Most U.S. troops will be pulled out of Iraq by the end of the year. And the Obama administration has been careful not to take on responsibility for rebuilding Libya after the NATO bombing campaign that helped drive Moammar Gadhafi from power.

Read more
Around the Nation
6:00 am
Thu November 24, 2011

Asking For Quiet: How To Defuse Thanksgiving Spats

When families get together for Thanksgiving, spirited discussions can sometimes break out at the table.
Vanda Grigorovic iStockphoto.com

The Thanksgiving holiday offers a chance to connect with family and enjoy a relaxing meal. But it doesn't always happen that way — especially when political arguments break out at the table. We asked our audience to share their stories on NPR's Facebook page, and the responses came rolling in.

Stef Work echoed the sentiment of many, saying, "I don't think I am alone when I find the visits too long and the social graces too few."

Read more
The Record
6:00 am
Thu November 24, 2011

On Commercial Radio, Christmas Is Coming Early

Christmas music superstar Bing Crosby performing in 1977, back when the season, at least on the radio, started after Thanksgiving.
Getty Images

If it seems like you're hearing more Christmas music on the radio these days, it's not your imagination. More stations have been going all-Christmas — and they're doing it earlier than ever.

The reason is simple: Christmas music makes ratings go through the roof.

Read more
Politics
5:55 am
Thu November 24, 2011

David Frum Asks, 'When Did The GOP Lose Touch?'

Brendan Smialowski Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 10:01 am

Republican David Frum, a former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, is seriously upset with the state of his party. He's written an article in the current New York magazine, titled "When Did the GOP Lose Touch with Reality?"

As he tells NPR's Steve Inskeep, one of Frum's complaints is the idea that his fellow Republicans insist on having their own set of facts.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:54 am
Thu November 24, 2011

Map: How Travelers, Expatriates And Service Members Spend Thanksgiving

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 9:52 am

Thanksgiving has all the makings of a uniquely American tradition: parades, football, pumpkin pie, roasted turkey. But for Americans living in other countries, observing the traditional way can be a challenge. We asked those who will be abroad this Thanksgiving how they'll be spending the holiday — and what changes they'll have to make to their celebrations. We received more than 1,200 responses from our Facebook followers. Some of the most common issues? Finding an inexpensive turkey or locating canned pumpkin. Here's a sample of what you said. Responses have been edited for space.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:30 am
Thu November 24, 2011

Historic GM Plant Finds New Life As A Pharmacy

Members of the nascent United Auto Workers union staged sit-down strikes in several Flint, Mich., Fisher Body plants in late 1936 and early 1937.
Sheldon Dick Getty Images

The former Fisher Body 1 plant in Flint, Mich., produced a lot of cars, thousands of jobs and lots of history — it was one of the places where sit-down strikes led to recognition of the United Auto Workers in 1937.

But General Motors abandoned what remained of the site after its bankruptcy, and the new occupants don't make cars there. Instead, they're riding the next economic wave, selling prescription drugs to an aging population.

Read more
NPR Story
5:16 am
Thu November 24, 2011

'Prince and The Show Girl'

In 1956, two icons — Marilyn Monroe and Sir Laurence Olivier — got together in London to make a movie, The Prince and the Showgirl. It was a comedy about the lonely Prince Regent of Carpathia, who meets a flirty American showgirl. The film was a royal flop. Now a new movie, My Week With Marilyn, recounts the miserable time had by all on the set. It's the story of one week during the film shoot, with behind-the-scenes clashes, misaligned acting styles, and the pursuit of personal ambitions. Michelle Williams plays Monroe and Kenneth Branagh plays Olivier.

NPR Story
4:54 am
Thu November 24, 2011

Bond Worries Reveal The Depths Of Europe's Crisis

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 10:01 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

The cost of borrowing is the best way to gauge the severity of Europe's crisis. Here's Zoe Chace of NPR's Planet Money team.

ZOE CHACE, BYLINE: Andrew Balls has a front seat to the European debt crisis. That's because he's someone who lends money to European countries. He's at one of the biggest bond outfits in the world: PIMCO. He says, if you look back over the course of the year, there is one moment that stands out, a tipping point.

Read more

Pages