It's All Politics
5:07 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Sen. Marco Rubio Denies Embellishing His Background As A Cuban Exile

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio on Friday lambasted the Washington Post for an article claiming that he "embellished" the facts of his parents' emigration to the U.S..

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The Two-Way
4:50 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Mo. Repeals Law Banning Teacher-Student Contact On Facebook

Today, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon signed into a law a bill that effectively repeals one passed earlier this year that barred teachers from having contact with any student on Facebook or any social media site that enabled private messaging.

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Shots - Health Blog
4:41 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Pill Or Candy? Can You Guess Which Of These Is Medicine?

Casey Gittelman present her study findings at a medical meeting in Boston.

Courtesy of Michael Gittelman

I couldn't let the week pass without a quick quiz.

Which one of the four red tablets in the picture is medicine? The mystery pill is Coricidin HPB, an over-the-counter cold remedy, if that helps. The candies are M&M's and a Skittle. Pull the slider to the right for the answer.

If you didn't get it right, don't feel bad.

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Eleanor Beardsley began reporting from France for NPR in June 2004, following all aspects of French society, politics, economics, culture and gastronomy.

Beardsley has covered both 2007 and 2012 French presidential elections as well as the Arab Spring in Tunisia, where she witnessed the overthrow of the autocratic President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. She reported on the riots in French suburbs in 2005 and the massive student demonstrations in 2006. Beardsley has followed the Tour de France cycling race and been back to her old stomping ground — Kosovo — to report for NPR on three separate occasions.

Africa
4:16 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Tunisian Poll To Provide Bellwether For Arab Spring

A Tunisian woman in the capital, Tunis, walks past a wall covered with posters of political candidates, on Oct. 20. Tunisia touched off the Arab uprisings this year, and it is holding elections Sunday to draw up a new constitution.

Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 8:42 pm

Tunisians, who touched off the Arab uprisings and rid themselves of a dictator nine months ago, are now going to the polls to elect a constitutional assembly. There is pride, confusion, but mostly optimism ahead of Sunday's vote.

The people of Tunisia had basically one choice at the ballot box for the last 50 years. But now they have more than 100 parties and thousands of candidates to choose from. And they're getting a taste of a real political campaign.

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

Today's Distraction: Slamming A Ford Focus Into A Concrete Wall At 120 MPH

What happens if a Ford Focus slams into a concrete wall at 120 mph?

The guys at the British motoring show Fifth Gear — an offshoot of the popular Top Gear — wanted to find out. They make some grand claims about the test they conducted. For example they say the test is the fastest test crash ever conducted, which brings up doubt. They also say the test was so fast, test experts didn't want to use their dummies. They're too expensive and it was likely they would be destroyed.

Anyway, the video is pretty incredible:

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David Schaper is a NPR National Desk reporter based in Chicago.

In this role, he covers news in Chicago and around the Midwest. Additionally he reports on a broad range of important social, cultural, political, and business issues in the region.

The range of Schaper's reporting has included profiles of service members killed in Iraq, and members of a reserve unit returning home to Wisconsin. He produced reports on the important political issues in key Midwest battleground states, education issues related to "No Child Left Behind," the bankruptcy of United Airlines as well as other aviation and transportation issues, and the devastation left by tornadoes, storms, blizzards, and floods in the Midwest.

Yuki Noguchi is a correspondent on the Business Desk based out of NPR's headquarters in Washington D.C. Since joining NPR in 2008, she's covered business and economic news, and has a special interest in workplace issues — everything from abusive working environments, to the idiosyncratic cubicle culture. In recent years she has covered the housing market meltdown, unemployment during the Great Recession, and covered the aftermath of the tsunami in Japan in 2011. As in her personal life, however, her coverage interests are wide-ranging, and have included things like entomophagy and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Crisis In The Housing Market
3:39 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

A Bid To Bring Foreign Buyers To The Housing Market

A home in Seattle is advertised for sale in January. A housing boom 140 miles north in Vancouver, British Columbia, is being fueled by buyers from India and China, while building remains at a standstill in Seattle, one housing expert says.

Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 7:10 pm

Existing home sales and home prices declined last month, indicating the market remains in a slump. Now there's a proposal in Congress to try to change that. Sens. Mike Lee, R-Utah, and Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., introduced a bill Thursday that would grant U.S. tourist visas to foreign homebuyers paying with cash.

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The Salt
3:33 pm
Fri October 21, 2011

A Premiere Chef Explores The Jiggly Joys Of Gelatin

Chef Jose Andres at his avant garde Minibar restaurant in Washington. Andres' experiments with gelatins have helped make him one of the most innovative chefs in the country.

Jacquelyn Martin ASSOCIATED PRESS

If you think gelatin's charms go no further than wobbly, crimson cubes of lunchroom Jell-O, one of the most celebrated and ambitious chefs in the country would like to convince you otherwise.

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