Africa
7:29 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Reports: Libya's Ghadafi And His Hometown Captured

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 10:50 am

Renee Montagne talks with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro about multiple reports of the possible capture of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

The Two-Way
6:34 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Gadhafi Is Dead, Tripoli Rejoices

Anti-Gaddafi fighters celebrate the fall of Sirte in the town October 20, 2011.

Esam Omran Al-Fetori Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:19 am

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The Two-Way
6:16 am
Thu October 20, 2011

In Ohio: All Animals Accounted For, Sheriff Says

After a harrowing night and day spent hunting escaped bears, lions, tigers and other dangerous animals, authorities in Muskingum County, Ohio, believe they have killed, captured or otherwise accounted for 56 animals that were freed Tuesday from a private reserve by a man who it's believed then killed himself.

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Around the Nation
5:02 am
Thu October 20, 2011

Occupy Wall Street: From A Blog Post To A Movement

The Occupy Wall Street protests have inspired similar events around America, and in dozens of countries. Here, a truck has been painted with a sign supporting the Occupy Portland protests in Oregon.

Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Thu October 20, 2011 10:26 am

After more than 30 days, the Occupy Wall Street movement has evolved from a protest in New York City into a growing international movement. And it all started in July, as a single blog post inspired by the Arab Spring.

Here's a look at significant developments in the Occupy Wall Street timeline, as the movement gathered momentum and spread to other U.S. cities.

Timeline: Tracking Occupy Wall Street's Growth

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David Aquila ("Quil") Lawrence is an award-winning correspondent for NPR News, covering the millions of Americans who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan as they transition to life back at home.

Previously, Lawrence served as NPR's Bureau Chief in Kabul. He joined NPR in 2009 as Baghdad Bureau Chief – capping off ten years of reporting in Iraq and all the bordering countries. That experience made the foundation for his first book Invisible Nation: How the Kurds' Quest for Statehood is Shaping Iraq and the Middle East, published in 2008.

NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. He joined NPR in 1996, and was based in San Francisco before moving to Boston in 2001.

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk. He covers the news throughout the Northwest, with an emphasis on technology and privacy stories.

In addition to general assignment reporting throughout the region, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Focusing on technology and privacy issues, Kaste has reported on the government's wireless wiretapping practices as well as the data-collection and analysis that goes on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in a US Supreme Court opinion concerning GPS tracking.

Mara Liasson is the national political correspondent for NPR. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines All Things Considered and Morning Edition. Liasson provides extensive coverage of politics and policy from Washington, DC — focusing on the White House and Congress — and also reports on political trends beyond the Beltway.

Afghanistan
11:01 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

Afghan Civilians Allegedly Forced Onto Mined Roads

Afghanistan's Panjwai district, southwest of Kandahar city, was a Taliban stronghold until the U.S. troop surge in 2010 began to displace the insurgents.

Allauddin Khan AP

Villagers from a violent part of southern Afghanistan say that Afghan troops, along with several American mentors, forced civilians to march ahead of soldiers on roads where the Taliban were believed to have planted bombs and landmines.

No one was hurt. But if the allegations are true, the act would appear to violate the Geneva Conventions governing the treatment of civilians. The episode also raises questions about how civilians are caught between the two sides in the war.

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Economy
11:01 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

Frustration Over Jobs Unites 'Occupiers' In Boston

Occupy Boston protesters congregate across the street from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Chris Arnold NPR

The U.S. hasn't had unemployment this high for this long since the Great Depression. That's weighing heavily on a lot of Americans and seems to be a key part of the frustration and anger that's being directed at Wall Street and the big banks. For many people, it's not so much about high finance as it is about a weekly paycheck.

"I'm unemployed, and I'm down here because I'm unemployed," says Bob Norkus, a protester in downtown Boston.

Walking around, it doesn't take long to figure out that many people here have the same problem.

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