Mitt Romney
3:22 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

With Romney In Race, Mormon Church Steps Up Ads

An "I'm A Mormon" billboard in New York's Times Square in June.The LDS church expanded the ad campaign to 12 new cities within the last week.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 4:59 pm

Just as former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney tries to overcome unease about his Mormon faith in his bid for the Republican presidential nomination, a new ad campaign promoting the religion is drawing attention.

"I'm a Mormon" billboards and television commercials aimed at improving the religious group's public image have surfaced over the past week in states almost certain to be battlegrounds for next year's presidential contest.

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Mike Pesca first reached the airwaves as a 10-year-old caller to a New York Jets-themed radio show and has since been able to parlay his interests in sports coverage as a National Desk correspondent  for NPR based in New York City.

Pesca enjoys training his microphone on anything that occurs at a track, arena, stadium, park, fronton, velodrome or air strip (i.e. the plane drag during the World's Strongest Man competition). He has reported from Los Angeles, Cleveland and Gary. He has also interviewed former Los Angeles Ram Cleveland Gary. Pesca is a panelist on the weekly Slate podcast “Hang up and Listen”.

Beijing Correspondent Louisa Lim is currently attending the University of Michigan as a Knight-Wallace Fellow. She will return to her regular role in 2014.

Based in Beijing, NPR foreign correspondent Louisa Lim finds China a hugely diverse, vibrant, fascinating place. "Everywhere you look and everyone you talk to has a fascinating story," she notes, adding that she's "spoiled with choices" of stories to cover. In her reports, Lim takes "NPR listeners to places they never knew existed. I want to give them an idea of how China is changing and what that might mean for them."

Deborah Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News. Her reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition.

Amos travels extensively across the Middle East covering a range of stories including the rise of well-educated Syria youth who are unqualified for jobs in a market-drive economy, a series focusing on the emerging power of Turkey and the plight of Iraqi refugees.

Middle East
3:06 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

In Syria, Can The President Outlast The Protesters?

Syrian women stroll past posters of President Bashar Assad in Damascus on Monday. Assad has relied heavily on his security forces as he battles an uprising now in its eighth month.

Muzaffar Salman AP

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 7:40 pm

Syria's President Bashar Assad has survived an uprising that's now in its eighth month, and he shows no signs of buckling. The president has relied on a massive security presence to limit protests at home, and has dismissed criticism and sanctions from abroad.

But is this strategy sustainable, or is Assad simply buying time?

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

Out Of Wall Street Protest, An Unlikely Celebrity: 'Hipster Cop'

We've covered the serious news out of the Occupy Wall Street movement today. But The Gray Lady has a story we just couldn't stay away from.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:14 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

Abbott Unveils Breakup, Plans To Settle Alleged Marketing Misdeeds

Abbott Labs is splitting up. The diversified maker of medical products will become two companies: one focused on brand-name prescription drugs and the second on the other stuff, including medical devices, diagnostic tests and baby formula.

It's a big deal, and Forbes' Matt Herper explains the logic behind it: Investors aren't giving drugmakers much respect, so separating the businesses could give a lift to the future stock of the faster-growing non-drug business.

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Economy
2:04 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

A Hard-Times Journey: Where Should NPR Go?

Luis Pedrosa iStockphoto.com

Americans are worried. Fourteen million people are unemployed. Wages are flat. And there's concern about a double dip recession. But for many Americans, it feels like the last recession never ended.

And many economists don't expect a real turnaround anytime soon. They call it "The New Normal" or "The Great Stagnation."

The country has always come back from hard times. Is this time different?

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Books
2:00 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

Some Good Came From The National Book Award Mix-Up

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 4:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Business
2:00 pm
Wed October 19, 2011

UAW President Discusses Ford Contract

Robert Siegel speaks with United Auto Workers president Bob King about the contract ratified by Ford workers Tuesday night — and the future of the auto business in the U.S. King says although he's used to seeing higher margins of support from the rank and file, he's satisfied that 62 percent of the Ford workers who voted approved of the contract.

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