Amanda Vinicky

Read Amanda's "The Players" blog.

Amanda Vinicky has covered Illinois politics and government for WUIS and the Illinois Public Radio network since 2006.  Highlights include reporting on the historic impeachment and removal from office of former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, winning a national award for her coverage of Illinois' electric rate fight as a result of deregulation, and following Illinois' delegations to the Democratic and Republican national political conventions in '08 and '12.  

Though she's full-time with WUIS now, she previously interned with the station in graduate school; she graduated from the University of Illinois Springfield's Public Affairs Reporting program in '05.  She also holds degrees in journalism and political science from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign. 

Amanda is insatiably curious, so please reach out to her and get in touch if you notice something interesting going on at the Capitol! She can be reached at (217) 206-6019 or (773) 217-0316. If she's not in the statehouse bureau, you can usually find Amanda tweeting, dining at a local restaurant, taking a jog around Springfield or Chicago or practicing yoga. 

Amanda Vinicky

 Hillary Clinton officially became Democrats’ nominee Tuesday night at the party’s national convention in Philadelphia.

 

State delegations to the convention took turns casting their votes.

When  it was Illinois' turn, party chairman Michael Madigan got things started by introducing the with a nod to its Democratic heavyweights, like President Barack Obama. Then Madigan passed off the microphone to Bernie Sanders’ state director Clem Balanoff.

For the first time … a major party has nominated a woman for President. Hillary Clinton officially became Democrats’ nominee Tuesday night at the party’s national convention in Philadelphia.

State delegations to the convention took turns casting their votes.

When  it wasw Illinois' turn, party chairman Michael Madigan got things started by introducing the with a nod to its Democratic heavyweights, like President Barack Obama. Then Madigan passed off the microphone to Bernie Sanders’ state director Clem Balanoff.

Illinois Democrats joined fellow party members in Philadelphia Monday for the Democratic National Convention. But state politics, not the national scene, was the focus of the delegation’s first official day of business.

Amanda Vinicky

Illinois’ delegates to the Democratic National Convention are in Philadelphia, where they’re set to nominate Hillary Clinton for President.

Philadelphia made efforts to make good on its “City of Brothery Love” appellation: Greeters waited near the baggage claim, to welcome convention guests, with miniature colonial-era American flags and packages soft pretzels made in Philly.

Philadelphia, of course, the birthplace of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.

Amanda Vinicky

  The conventional wisdom is that  Ted Cruz’s speech at the Republican National Convention tore open fresh wounds of a divided party.

Illinois National Republican Committeeman Richard Porter says the outrage at Cruz isn’t a sign of discord

“That was unity man, that was 25,000 people booing him all at once," he said.

The comment prompted Jim Fisher, a farmer from near Bloomington, to walk out of the Illinois delegation’s morning meeting.

"No, no – that’s what, that’s what. No, no, I don’t agree with that," he said.

 A high-school senior from Downers Grove already has a notable life experience to brag about when he starts applying to college: the 17-year-old is part of Illinois’ delegation to the Republican National Convention. Three generations of his family are in Cleveland for the RNC.

Amanda Vinicky

Donald Trump is now the Republican nominee for President, after delegates in Cleveland awarded him their votes Tuesday night. For some Illinois Republicans, it’s a time for vindication and celebration. But others remain wary.

The real work of nominating a major party candidate for president is done in the caucuses and primaries that began what may seem like ages ago.

Actually, the Iowa caucuses were less than six months ago – in the blistering cold of early February.

Monday night's headline speech at the Republican National Convention by Donald Trump’s wife was supposed to exhibit the presumptive Republican nominee’s compassionate, fatherly side. Instead, it’s been a distraction, including for the Illinois delegation.

The political strategist who helped Trump take Illinois’ primary stopped by the morning state delegation breakfast, but reporters didn’t want to talk to him how Trump could win the general election.

Amanda Vinicky

 

  A mix of Illinois political newcomers, elected officials, lobbyists and others have arrived in Cleveland, as the Republican National Convention gets underway.

Sometimes, truth really is stranger than fiction.

Take this scene from the TV show The West Wing, when a couple of Democratic White House staffers jealously scoff at Republicans’ easy rally behind a nominee.

“Get ready for press questions about how organized and unified the Republicans are compared to us," says one.

 An Illinois delegation that’s a mix of political newcomers, elected officials, lobbyists and the like have arrived in Cleveland, as the Republican National Convention gets underway.

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