Amanda Vinicky

Read Amanda's "The Players" blog.

Amanda Vinicky has covered Illinois politics and government for WUIS and the Illinois Public Radio network since 2006.  Highlights include reporting on the historic impeachment and removal from office of former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, winning a national award for her coverage of Illinois' electric rate fight as a result of deregulation, and following Illinois' delegations to the Democratic and Republican national political conventions in '08 and '12.  

Though she's full-time with WUIS now, she previously interned with the station in graduate school; she graduated from the University of Illinois Springfield's Public Affairs Reporting program in '05.  She also holds degrees in journalism and political science from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign. 

Amanda is insatiably curious, so please reach out to her and get in touch if you notice something interesting going on at the Capitol! She can be reached at (217) 206-6019 or (773) 217-0316. If she's not in the statehouse bureau, you can usually find Amanda tweeting, dining at a local restaurant, taking a jog around Springfield or Chicago or practicing yoga. 

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

Anxious legislators will once again see a deposit from the state of Illinois in their bank accounts. They’re getting paid tomorrow.

Illinois doesn’t have enough money in the bank to pay all of its own bills. As a result, the comptroller’s office is way behind paying businesses contracted to do work for the state.

The backlog of overdue bills is approaching $8 billion. A lot of money, to be sure.

But what does that even mean?

Maybe the best way to measure it: How often legislators themselves are getting paid.

The candidates vying to be Illinois comptroller are at odds over whether the office should even continue to exist.

WUIS

Accessing life insurance benefits in Illinois will be easier, thanks to a new website and state law signed Friday by Governor Bruce Rauner.

What happens if a family grieving the loss of a loved one is owed life insurance money, but doesn't make a claim for it? In cases, the insurance companies held onto the money.

Amanda Vinicky

The massive unfunded Illinois pension obligation has made reducing the state's costs a priority for years.

An overhaul of retirement benefits for state employees, public school teachers and university workers has been the subject of talks between state leaders in recent months.

Gov. Bruce Rauner said as much Wednesday, but he sounded uncertain as to what will come of it.

The state Supreme Court has ruled that a previous law cutting pension benefits was unconstitutional.

Wikimedia Commons

The Democratic State Central Committee took less than five minutes to vote on its electors at a meeting in Springfield Monday

Most committee members weren't even there in person; they voted by proxy.

Still, it was meaningful for Menard County Democratic Party Chairwoman Shirley McCombs, who says women have "waited 240 years" to see one of their own potentially elected president.

"I think it's probably the most important event of my life," she said.

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