Amanda Vinicky

Read Amanda's "The Players" blog.

Amanda Vinicky has covered Illinois politics and government for WUIS and the Illinois Public Radio network since 2006.  Highlights include reporting on the historic impeachment and removal from office of former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, winning a national award for her coverage of Illinois' electric rate fight as a result of deregulation, and following Illinois' delegations to the Democratic and Republican national political conventions in '08 and '12.  

Though she's full-time with WUIS now, she previously interned with the station in graduate school; she graduated from the University of Illinois Springfield's Public Affairs Reporting program in '05.  She also holds degrees in journalism and political science from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign. 

Amanda is insatiably curious, so please reach out to her and get in touch if you notice something interesting going on at the Capitol! She can be reached at (217) 206-6019 or (773) 217-0316. If she's not in the statehouse bureau, you can usually find Amanda tweeting, dining at a local restaurant, taking a jog around Springfield or Chicago or practicing yoga. 

Flickr user Pictures of Money / "Money" (CC BY 2.0)

State workers suing to put an end to mandatory union dues will appeal a judge's order dismissing their case.

That's according to their attorney, Jacob Huebert, who is with the conservative-supported Liberty Justice Center.

At issue are fees Illinois government employees pay to cover unions' collective bargaining costs.

Huebert says they shouldn’t be required; he alleges the so-called "fair share" fees also support politics.


He may call himself the leader of Illinois' Republican Party, but Governor Bruce Rauner is continuing his refusal to weigh in on this year's biggest election.

A record-setting audience of roughly 80 million people tuned in to watch Monday's presidential debate.

The next day, a reporter asked Rauner if he did the same.  

"I did not," the governor responded.  

Which means Rauner didn't hear Donald Trump's comments about Illinois' largest city.

"Construction Cones" by Flickr User The Tire Zoo / (CC X 2.0)

Illinois voters will vote this fall on a constitutional amendment affecting road funding.  

In the past, the state has reallocated road funding to plug holes in the budget.  

Fed up with this move, road contractors and construction workers had an idea:  Amend the Illinois Constitution so these funds must be used on transportation needs, and nothing else.

Lawmakers overwhelmingly agreed to put the amendment on this year's ballot.    

The Illinois Supreme Court struck  down a law Thursday  that cut civil juries in half and hiked their pay.  

When lawmakers passed the measure in 2014, they argued that having fewer jurors made the higher pay affordable.

But critics say it was a thinly-veiled parting gift from state Democrats to to trial lawyers.

The thought is that smaller juries would be prone to paying out higher awards in personal injury cases.

Doctor Tom Anderson is president of the Illinois State Medical Society.

  The University of Illinois has received a relatively glowing financial report from Moody's Investor Service, but it comes with some caveats.  

The firm credits U of I leaders for having bolstered the school's balance sheet. The report says the school's brand and diverse revenue base -- for example, high demand from international students -- add credit stability that's helped to cushion state funding blows.  This includes the current budget impasse, which has resulted in public universities going nearly a year without funding.