Brian Mackey

Brian Mackey covers state government and politics for WUIS and a dozen other public radio stations across Illinois. He was previously A&E editor at The State Journal-Register and Statehouse bureau chief for the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin. He can be reached at (217) 206-6412.

Subscribe to Brian Mackey's State of the State podcast on WUIS' podcast page, or by copying this URL into iTunes or any other podcast app.

Brian Mackey

  Illinois Republicans rallied in Springfield yesterday, but it was obvious one man is the driving force behind their party.  Governor Bruce Rauner. 

For the Republican Party faithful, what was once an annual duty to be endured has been transformed into an occasion for celebration. State Rep. Jim Durkin, the House minority leader, describes the pleasure of a state fair rally when it’s his party in the governor’s office.

  Who should pay for the Illinois courts?

Illinois’ judicial system is increasingly being funded by the men and women who find themselves in court. For both civil and criminal cases, fees and fines have been growing, especially in the last decade.

Now a task force is out with its examination of the system and recommendations for change.

To get the lay of the land, we thought we’d revisit our report on the subject from last year.

Who should pay for the Illinois courts?

senatorbennett.com

Some Illinois politicians are making a push to eliminate time limits on when people can be prosecuted for child sex crimes.

The move was prompted by the case of former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert.   

Although he pleaded guilty to violating federal banking laws, Hastert's 15-month sentence took into account his admission that he sexually abused teenage boys when he was a high school wrestling coach.

Brian Mackey

In the political gridlock that’s seized Illinois government, much of the attention has centered on the fight between Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and the Democratic leaders in the General Assembly.

But a new analysis says someone else should share the blame: voters. The people of Illinois are giving politicians contradictory instructions -- namely, keep taxes low but state services high.

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