Brian Mackey

Brian Mackey covers state government and politics for NPR Illinois and a dozen other public radio stations across the state. He was previously A&E editor at The State Journal-Register and Statehouse bureau chief for the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin.

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Gov. Bruce Rauner has spent much of the past few years bad-mouthing the Illinois economy — saying his agenda would turn things around. But not everyone in his administration is sounding the alarm.

flickr user / Michael Coghlan "Prison Bars" (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Advocates say the treatment of Illinois prisoners with mental illness is so bad that the prison system is in a “state of emergency.” They’re asking a federal judge to intervene.

More than a year ago, the Illinois Department of Corrections agreed that it needed to improve its treatment of prisoners with mental illness. It settled a decade-old court case, but lawyers for the prisoners say the state isn’t improving quickly enough.

U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis was back in his central Illinois district Friday, donating blood in Springfield.

He’s among the Republicans who’ve indicated an openness to tighter regulations on "bump stocks," devices that enabled the Las Vegas shooter to fire more rapidly. Davis had personal experience of a mass shooting earlier this year, when a man opened fire as he and other Congressmen were playing baseball.

jb-pritzker.com

J.B. Pritzker won another big-ticket endorsement in his campaign to win the Democratic nomination for Illinois governor.

The Democratic County Chairmen’s Association met in Springfield over the weekend and picked Pritzker from the large field of candidates. Association President Doug House says Pritzker — a billionaire who’s self-funding his campaign — is the only candidate who can build the infrastructure to take on Gov. Bruce Rauner next year.

RAY MOORE / FLICKR.COM/RARSTUDIOS (CC-BY-NC)

State and federal legislators from Illinois are proposing new laws in response to Sunday’s mass shooting in Las Vegas.

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