Brian Mackey

Brian Mackey covers state government and politics for WUIS and a dozen other public radio stations across Illinois. He was previously A&E editor at The State Journal-Register and Statehouse bureau chief for the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin. He can be reached at (217) 206-6412.

Subscribe to Brian Mackey's State of the State podcast on WUIS' podcast page, or by copying this URL into iTunes or any other podcast app.

illinoiscourts.gov

The Illinois Supreme Court has upheld a barrier to suing for "negligent infliction of emotional distress." It’s called the “impact rule.”

The rule is simple: in order to claim someone’s negligence caused you distress, you have to be “impacted.” Literally have something or someone make physical contact with you.

The case was brought by a Northbrook woman whose home was in foreclosure. She was startled when a contractor hired by Chase Home Finance entered what he thought was an abandoned home -- startled, but not “impacted."

A new survey argues criminals should get rehabilitation rather than punishment; the recommendation comes straight from crime victims themselves.

The study says one in three Illinoisans have been a victim of crime in the last decade. More likely to be victimized are people who are younger and lower-income, as well as blacks, Latinos and residents of Chicago.

Lenore Anderson is president of the Alliance for Safety and Justice, which commissioned the survey. She says contrary to the conventional wisdom, a majority of victims do not support long prison sentences.

"Prison Bars" by Flickr User Michael Coghlan / (CC X 2.0)

Most of the Illinois Department of Corrections workers have completed mental-illness training as part of  a settlement over how prisons treat inmates with mental health disorders.

State Prison Director John Baldwin says the training will make working in prison safer. 

"Seventy-eight percent of all assaults on staff across the United States are committed by an offender with an identified behavioral health issue," he said.  

Screen Capture/Facebook

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner appeared in another Facebook Live video Tuesday to discuss the budget.

Rauner sat alone at a desk, delivering a version of the pro-business, anti-incumbent talking points he's used for nearly four years.

AARON SCHOCK / INSTAGRAM

Former U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock is due to be arraigned in a Springfield courtroom this afternoon.  

The 35-year-old Republican is charged with scheming to defraud the government, campaign donors, and constituents. Federal prosecutors say it adds up to thousands upon thousands of dollars for everything from cars and cameras to vacations and Super Bowl tickets.

Shock resigned last year. He’s said any mistakes made in Congress were administrative errors.

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