Brian Mackey

Brian Mackey covers state government and politics for NPR Illinois and a dozen other public radio stations across the state. He was previously A&E editor at The State Journal-Register and Statehouse bureau chief for the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin.

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Police in Illinois have limited power when it comes to matters of immigration. Attorney General Lisa Madigan issued legal guidance Wednesday to remind officers of what's permissible.  

Illinois law prohibits an arrest based only on someone’s immigration status. Madigan said this is important because, nationwide, police say they're getting fewer reports of crime from immigrants. She noted they are a group "who may be concerned that, if they come forward to report, that either themselves or their family members may be in jeopardy of deportation."


Environmental groups are criticizing Ameren Illinois for what they describe as backing away from energy efficiency goals.

Carl Nelson / WNIJ

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner is rejecting calls for a state-level immigrants’ bill of rights.

It came a day after President Donald Trump announced he’s ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which deferred deportation proceedings for certain young undocumented immigrants. On Wednesday, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel called on Rauner to protect those so-called dreamers by establishing a bill of rights. But Rauner said it’s a federal issue.

The Illinois state treasurer is urging legislators to override one of Gov. Bruce Rauner’s recent vetoes. Democrat Mike Frerichs says the override is needed to help people claim life insurance benefits. 

The Democrat is pushing legislation that would force life insurance companies to open up more than a decade’s worth of records, looking for unclaimed policies. Frerichs claimed many of the policies in question were issued in poor neighborhoods on the hopes that beneficiaries would never collect.

With Labor Day parades stepping off across Illinois today, Democratic politicians are thinking about how to win back the once-solid support of union members.