Chase Cavanaugh

Morning Edition Producer/Reporter

Chase started in radio while earning his Master's in diplomacy and international commerce at the University of Kentucky.  He was bitten by the radio bug while volunteering at Radio Eye (a local equivalent to NIRIS) and soon became a reporter at WUKY. After four years of reporting in Kentucky's Bluegrass, Chase traveled north to join WNIJ as Morning Edition producer.  He organizes our morning broadcast, making sure the host is well-supplied with interesting, fresh content.  In addition to his pre-dawn duties, Chase reports on a variety of developments in our broadcast area but is particularly drawn to anything with a political or international connection.  He is also an avid board gamer.

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DeKalb police are investigating the theft of several catalytic converters. 

The incidents mostly occurred on the northwest of town, and officials have stepped up patrols.  However, they haven't yet named any suspects.  Police recommend residents park in well-lit areas and immediately report any suspicious activity.  

Catalytic converters contain precious metals such as platinum and palladium.  These make the devices targets for thieves, who then sell the metal at scrap yards.  

County governments are responsible for building regional police stations and jails.   But when those buildings get too old, there may be obstacles to getting them replaced.

Back in the 1960s, Ogle County built its current jail. About 10 years later, Lee County followed suit.  These buildings have served their purpose, but Ogle County Sheriff Brian VanVickle says keeping the facility running has become increasingly difficult.

The DeKalb County Board unanimously approved a moratorium on new wind and solar farms for 18 months, or until the county releases a sustainable energy plan. 

The Daily Chronicle reports the board plans on using this time to assess the various effects wind towers would have on the community.  These include value of nearby properties, aesthetic considerations, and any consequences for wildlife.  

The DeKalb City Council approved a rezoning request for a medical cannabis dispensary. 

Chicago-Based Justice Grown wants to open the facility at 650 Peace Road.  However, it now requires a license from the state’s Department of Financial and Professional Regulation.  This is permitted by the state's medical cannabis pilot program, which was approved in 2013.

Illinois officials continue to remind residents that human trafficking remains a problem. 

It can include being forced to perform labor or work as a prostitute, and often involves minors.  George Sheldon directs the state’s Department of Children and Family Services.  He says there have been 821 allegations of child sex trafficking in the state since 2011.  

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