Jaclyn Driscoll

Jaclyn has an MA in Journalism from DePaul University and a BS in History form Monmouth College. Prior to reporting, Jaclyn was a social science teacher and department chair at Greenfield High School. Previously, Jaclyn reported for WICS Newschannel 20 where she covered a variety of assignments including courts, politics, and breaking news. She also reported at Siouxland News in Sioux City Iowa, the shared CBS/Fox television newsroom. Her internships included WGN and Comcast SportsNet in Chicago. 

WUIS/Illinois Issues

The opioid epidemic continues to sweep across Illinois and the rest of the nation. The Trump administration recently declared it a public health emergency. But some believe medical marijuana could be the solution.

Medicinal cannabis is legal in Illinois, but it’s only available to those who suffer from specific ailments like Muscular Dystrophy, seizures, cancer and more.

Illinois Innocence Project

The Illinois Innocence Project, based at the University of Illinois Springfield, has won a $641,000 grant for DNA testing intended to help exonerate wrongfully convicted inmates. 

The grant will be used over the course of two years. $200,000 of the funds must be used in DNA testing for two types of cases: potential eye witness misidentifications and false confessions.

John Hanlon, Executive Director of the Illinois Innocence Project, says DNA testing is often necessary for the cases he takes on, but also very costly. The most basic test is roughly $1,000.

Flickr user Ryo Chijiiwa / "Tommy Guns" (CC BY 2.0)

After recent mass shootings, some Illinois lawmakers reacted by filing legislation that would tighten restrictions on guns. But the veto session is over and gun laws remain unchanged.

 

Jaclyn Driscoll

Women in the Illinois Senate plan to advance their voices in leadership with the creation of their own caucus. Women on both sides of the aisle say they’ve had a significant role in crafting policy, but may not always get the credit they deserve. 

“I think the style of women is very different," says State Sen. Kimberly Lightford, D-Maywood. "We don’t have to have the pissing contest.”

A 2015 state law required high schools to develop concussion response procedures to protect student-athletes from further injury, but smaller schools may be at a disadvantage.