Jenna Dooley

WNIJ All Things Considered Host

Jenna Dooley has spent her professional career in public radio. She is a graduate of Northern Illinois University and the Public Affairs Reporting Program at the University of Illinois - Springfield. She returned to Northern Public Radio in DeKalb after several years hosting Morning Edition at WUIS-FM in Springfield.  For 2012, she was named "Newsfinder of the Year" by the Illinois Associated Press. She is also recipient of the 2014 Donald R. Grubb NIU Journalism Alumni Award. She is not afraid to brag at parties that she has met Carl Kasell, Ira Glass, and Garrison Keillor (and has pictures to prove it!) She is the former Recording Secretary for the Illinois News Broadcasters Association.

A leading addiction treatment advocate says service providers have a role in the next presidential term.

Marvin Ventrell is the Executive Director of the National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers. He served as keynote at the annual Rosecrance Forum on Thursday. Rosecrance offers addiction services for teens and adults at more than 40 locations in Chicago and Northern Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa.

Jenna Dooley

Rockford University will formally install its newest president this week.

Eric Fulcomer was introduced as the university’s 18th president in February. At that time, he said one of his priorities was recruitment. Prior to his selection, Fulcomer was the school's Vice President of Enrollment Management.

Enrollment of full-time undergraduate students at Rockford University reached a record high this fall with 924 students.

The new president also has some municipal government experience: He is a former mayor of Bluffton, Ohio.

Jenna Dooley

In higher education, "safe spaces" are places where people can feel open to express themselves. Northern Illinois University's Center for the Study of Women, Gender & Sexuality describes such an environment as a place "without fear of being violated, harassed or judged, no matter their gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, religious affiliation, economic class, citizenship status, or disability."

Jenna Dooley

Betty Hampa of Genoa was a freshman at Northern Illinois University in 1959. She says her friends invited her to volunteer as an usher at the Egyptian Theater for a visit by the then-Senator of Massachusetts.

“I just remember that he said things that would excite young people," Hampa recalls. "He seemed like he talked about going to the moon… a lot of exciting things. Because he was young, he was handsome. He just had this charisma about him or something that just really grabbed you."

photo provided

With just weeks to go, much attention is given to the 2016 presidential election in the United States. But a look back in time reveals some topics were very similar on the road to the White House in 1960.

On Oct. 25, 1959, then-Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kennedy visited a luncheon rally of Democratic committeemen in DeKalb County. Later, he made remarks before more than a thousand people at the Egyptian Theater in downtown DeKalb.

Pages