Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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Politics
2:41 pm
Fri November 18, 2011

Panetta On Other End Of Budget Cuts As Role Changes

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta (left) talks with Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in Washington on Tuesday. The pair testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on security issues relating to Iraq.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 12:41 pm

It's hard to miss the irony: Leon Panetta, as President Clinton's budget guru, backed billions of dollars in Pentagon cuts. Now, as secretary of defense, he's warning that the U.S. could become a "paper tiger" if his department's budget is further reduced.

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Around the Nation
2:59 pm
Tue November 15, 2011

As Occupy Camps Close, What's Next For Movement?

Occupy Wall Street protesters regroup in Foley Square after New York City police in riot gear removed the protesters from Zuccotti Park early Tuesday. The evacuation followed similar moves in Oakland, Calif., and Portland, Ore.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 10:09 am

As pressure mounts in cities across the country to evict Occupy protesters from parks and squares, the movement's supporters face a decision about what to do next.

After months-long sit-ins that have brought international attention to the movement's demand for greater economic equality, as well as occasional clashes between demonstrators and police, cities in recent days have moved in force to end the protests.

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Europe
12:54 pm
Fri November 11, 2011

Berlusconi's Days As 'Great Seducer' May Be At End

Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi delivers an address to Italy's Senate in December 2010. Berlusconi, whose political survival skills are legendary, promised to step down after the Senate approved an austerity package.
Alberto Pizzoli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 2:10 pm

The man known as Italy's Great Seducer may have finally lost his charm.

Silvio Berlusconi, the country's scandal-plagued prime minister, survivor of some 50 confidence motions over the years and twice thrown out of office, says he will exit from the Italian political scene now that the nation's parliament has passed an austerity package.

That resignation could come as early as this weekend, although there has been speculation that Berlusconi could hang on until as late as February, when new elections are expected to be held.

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It's All Politics
8:56 am
Thu November 10, 2011

Perry Says He 'Stepped In It' At Debate, And Many Agree

Texas Gov. Rick Perry stumbled during Wednesday night's Republican presidential candidate in Auburn Hills, Mich., at one point seeking help from Rep. Ron Paul, (R-TX).
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 3:27 pm

Texas Gov. Rick Perry was doing his best Thursday to limit the damage after he drew a blank at Wednesday's GOP candidate debate on his own plan to reduce the size of government.

Discussing the proposal, Perry said he would eliminate three federal agencies, but then could not name them all, despite being pressed by the moderator.

"Commerce, Education and the — what's the third one there? Let's see," the Texas governor said. Rival candidate Ron Paul suggested it might be the Environmental Protection Agency. "EPA, there you go," Perry responded — incorrectly.

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Around the Nation
2:43 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

'Occupy' Presents Big Problems For Big-City Mayors

Amy Barnes protests as police move in to clear a downtown street during an Occupy Atlanta demonstration the first weekend in November.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:06 pm

The nationwide Occupy movement might be targeting Wall Street, but it's arguably municipal governments that have felt the biggest impact so far.

Protesters have staged weeks-long sit-ins at public spaces in cities from New York to Atlanta to Pittsburgh to Oakland, Calif. Although the demonstrations have been largely peaceful, hundreds of protesters have been arrested and there have been a handful of violent clashes with law enforcement.

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Europe
3:24 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Greek Inaction Or Democracy In Action?

Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou leaves a news conference after a meeting with European Council President Herman Van Rompuy on Oct. 13 at EU headquarters in Brussels. EU leaders were surprised and angered Tuesday when Papandreou said he would place a debt restructuring proposal before Greek voters.

John Thys AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 1, 2011 9:12 pm

Greece, the birthplace of democracy, may be suffering from an overdose of public input.

The decision by Greece's government to hold a January referendum on its deal with the European Union to restructure public debt has thrown the pact — and investors — onto shaky ground. Stocks around the world took a sharp dive on Tuesday's news, and other European leaders left little doubt over how they felt.

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Politics
3:16 pm
Mon October 31, 2011

Facing Stiffened Opposition, Obama Goes It Alone

President Obama signed an executive order Monday directing the Food and Drug Administration to take steps to reduce drug shortages. The order is one of several similar actions the president has taken in recent weeks.

Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Mon October 31, 2011 7:30 pm

President Obama, faced with what he described as an "increasingly dysfunctional" Congress, has turned repeatedly in recent weeks to the time-honored, but often controversial executive order to unilaterally make policy.

On Monday, Obama signed an executive order designed to require drug companies to report anticipated manufacturing shortages in advance. Last week, he said he would issue an executive order designed to help ease home-refinancing rules. And earlier in the same week, the president issued a directive to cap student loan payments.

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Economy
2:43 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Consumers Remain Numb Even As Economy Grows

Although consumer spending is up, consumer confidence is at its worst since March 2009, at the height of the recession.

David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 8:40 am

Consumer spending is up, and the economy is growing a bit. Unemployment is high, but at least it looks like it's not going higher. Even Wall Street likes the Greek debt deal.

But to say that the American consumer remains skeptical would be an understatement. Just ask Kim Brown, a 34-year-old kindergarten teacher from Caroline County, Md.

"Everything is going up but our pay," Brown tells NPR. "I'm not confident at all. I think things are going to get worse before they come back."

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Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Wed October 26, 2011

Are Crackdowns A Turning Point For Occupy Protests?

Occupy Oakland protesters carry away a man who was hit by a police tear gas canister Tuesday near the Oakland City Hall.

AFP/Getty Images

Police crackdowns in Atlanta and Oakland, Calif., to disperse protests affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street movement could mark a turning point in the tactics of both the demonstrators and the authorities dealing with them, experts say.

Oakland police equipped with riot gear fired tear gas and, according to demonstrators, used rubber bullets and flash grenades on Tuesday to clear Frank Ogawa Park in front of City Hall. In Atlanta, helicopters circled over a small city park just after midnight Wednesday as officers moved in to arrest about 50 protesters.

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Conflict In Libya
3:59 pm
Thu October 20, 2011

Gadhafi's Last Days Still A Mystery

Libyan Transitional National Council fighters said Moammar Gadhafi was captured Thursday in this graffitti-filled culvert in Sirte.

Philippe Desmazes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:19 am

Moammar Gadhafi proved true to his word that he would remain in Libya and "die as a martyr," though his final hours were an ignominious end for a man who long ruled from a fortress-like compound in the heart of Tripoli.

His last moments were reportedly spent holed up in a culvert under a road in his hometown of Sirte as loyalist forces waged a losing battle to keep control of the city.

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