Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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It's All Politics
3:42 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Superstorm Sandy May Have Blown In Fresh Breeze Of Bipartisanship

President Obama is greeted by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie upon arriving in Atlantic City, N.J., on Wednesday to visit areas hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:02 pm

Amid the devastation caused by Sandy, there are signs the superstorm might have blown a fresh breeze into the nation's politics. Suddenly, everyone's talking about something that seemed impossible just days before — bipartisanship.

Nothing sums that attitude up better than the actions of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. Republican Christie, who has worked closely with GOP hopeful Mitt Romney's campaign and has consistently proved one of President Obama's harshest critics, put that aside in the aftermath of Sandy.

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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Wed October 31, 2012

Sandy Shuts Down New York And New Jersey Subways, Trains And Tunnels

Workers try to clear boats and debris from the New Jersey Transit's Morgan draw bridge on Wednesday in South Amboy, N.J., after Monday's storm surge from Sandy pushed boats and cargo containers onto the train tracks.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 4:36 pm

It's a commuter's nightmare.

Cars and buses are back on the road in New York City and New Jersey, but workers are still trying to put the subway system and commuter trains back in operation after the devastating effect of Superstorm Sandy. It's a process that could take days or weeks to complete.

The impact on the country's most densely populated metropolitan area has been extensive. Here's a look at what is, and mostly what isn't, working:

NEW YORK CITY:

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The Two-Way
2:40 pm
Tue October 30, 2012

Superstorm Shines A Light On Power Grid Vulnerabilities

A street light and utility pole brought down by Hurricane Sandy lay on the street in Avalon, N.J. About 2.5 million customers had no power Tuesday in New Jersey.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 3:09 pm

The storm that has spawned so many worst-ever superlatives managed a few more when it comes to electricity, with record-breaking power outages across 18 states stretching from Michigan and Indiana to Maine and North Carolina, according to a Department of Energy assessment.

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The Two-Way
2:08 pm
Tue October 30, 2012

Captain's Judgment Questioned After Sinking Of Tall Ship

The 180-foot sailing vessel Bounty goes down off the North Carolina coast on Monday.
USCG United States Coast Guard

Originally published on Fri December 14, 2012 11:41 am

When the HMS Bounty set sail in 1787, Captain William Bligh had only his instincts to safely complete a journey from England to the South Pacific island of Tahiti. Last week, Robin Walbridge, captain of a replica of Bligh's ship of mutiny fame, had every modern weather-forecasting resource to plan a voyage from New London, Conn., to St. Petersburg, Fla.

But it didn't keep him from a fatal misjudgment.

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The Two-Way
9:35 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Sandy Deals New York City Flooding, Fire And Blackouts

In New York City's financial district, cars floated in a flooded subterranean basement a day after Hurricane Sandy tore across the East Coast.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 3:27 pm

People across the New York metropolitan area confronted scenes of devastation from Superstorm Sandy on Tuesday: widespread flooding, power and transportation outages and a wind-swept fire that tore through dozens of houses in the borough of Queens.

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Around the Nation
3:10 pm
Mon October 29, 2012

Risks Rise With Hurricane Sandy's Surge

Waves crashed over a road in Winthrop, Mass., as Hurricane Sandy moved toward coastal areas Monday.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 7:17 am

Hurricane Sandy may be grinding closer to the East Coast with 90 mph winds and torrential rains, but the most devastating aspect is likely to be storm surge.

Simply put, storm surge is wind-driven water that is forced against the shore, piling up in low-lying areas where it can cause dangerous flooding. A number of factors can make storm surge worse: a massive storm with high winds headed straight for a region full of shallow coastal bays and inlets.

Sandy seems to have them all, says Chris Landsea, science and operations officer at the National Hurricane Center.

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House & Senate Races
2:03 pm
Sat October 27, 2012

Tale Of The Tape: Brown Vs. Warren In Massachusetts

Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Sat October 27, 2012 2:23 pm

A special election two years ago to fill the late Sen. Edward Kennedy's seat brought a huge change to Massachusetts politics: the first Republican U.S. senator in nearly four decades.

Not surprisingly, Sen. Scott Brown has been a thorn in the side of the state's Democratic establishment since his 2010 victory.

"Most of the time here, you have a Democratic primary and then shortly thereafter, a swearing in," says Maurice Cunningham, a political science professor at the University of Massachusetts, Boston.

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Around the Nation
3:37 pm
Fri October 26, 2012

Computers, Pinch Of Art Aid Hurricane Forecasters

These are some of the "spaghetti map" models used to generate a forecast for Hurricane Sandy's track. The models have grown increasingly sophisticated over the years.
PCWeather Products Inc.

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:07 pm

If you've ever found yourself anxiously wondering where a hurricane might make landfall, then you're probably familiar with "spaghetti charts" — the intertwined web of possible storm tracks put out by many forecasters.

Those lines represent hundreds of millions of observations from satellites, aircraft, balloons and buoys, all crunched from complex forecasting equations on some of the world's most powerful computers.

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It's All Politics
2:54 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Political Memes: Fast, Cheap And Out Of Control?

DailyKos.com

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 9:49 am

Even if you didn't watch any of the three presidential debates, chances are you're familiar with Big Bird, binders and bayonets.

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It's All Politics
6:00 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Five Debate-Worthy Facts About China

Workers scramble on a scaffold at a construction site in Hefei, central China's Anhui province, last month. China has approved a massive infrastructure package worth more than $158 billion, state media said in September, as the government seeks to boost the flagging economy.
STR/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:26 am

If the last presidential debate was any indication, you'll be hearing a lot about China in tonight's third and final face-off between President Obama and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.

Last week's debate was ostensibly about domestic issues, but that didn't stop China from being mentioned numerous times. Tonight's debate, focused on foreign policy, is sure to see relations with Beijing get a lot of airplay.

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