Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

The Canadian man who police say was involved in a foiled mass shooting plot reportedly expressed admiration for the 1999 Columbine High School massacre online.

Although police have yet to confirm his identity, Canadian media identifies the man as 19-year-old James Gamble. Police say he committed suicide as they closed in on him for allegedly planning attack at a shopping mall in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Updated at 11:10 p.m. ET

A video has emerged that purports to show militants of the self-declared Islamic State beheading 21 Egyptian Christians kidnapped last week in Libya.

Reuters reports: "In the video, militants in black marched the captives, dressed in orange jump suits, to a beach. They were forced down onto their knees, then beheaded."

Reuters says a caption on the five-minute video reads: "The people of the cross, followers of the hostile Egyptian church."

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

The Federal Aviation Administration has released long-awaited draft rules on the operation of pilotless drones, opening the nation's airspace to the commercial possibilities of the burgeoning technology, but not without restrictions.

House Speaker John Boehner says he's prepared to let the Department of Homeland Security run out of money to push the Republican majority's efforts to reverse President Obama's immigration initiative.

The fourth winter storm in the Northeast this year was adding to the 6 feet of snow already on the ground in some areas, bringing with it hurricane-force winds and near-white-out conditions.

In Massachusetts, Gov. Charlie Baker said at a news conference early today that snowfalls had already "significantly exceeded" expectations. Accumulation in the northern half of the state exceeded a foot in some places.

The cease-fire in eastern Ukraine appears to be largely holding — at least for the moment, defying skepticism that the second truce in six-months between government forces and Russian-backed separatists might immediately collapse.

The cease-fire went into effect at midnight Sunday (Saturday at 5 p.m. ET).

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which keeps a 24/7 vigil on the sun, just released this spectacular video composite to mark five years since the spacecraft was launched.

Updates at 11:15 p.m. ET: One shooting victim dies

The Associated Press is reporting that one of the three shooting victims outside of the Copenhagen synagogue has died.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET: A second shooting in Copenhagen

Danish police say gunfire near a Copenhagen synagogue left one person shot in the head and two police officers injured, Reuters reports.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

Police in Canada say they've foiled a Valentine's Day plot to carry out a mass shooting at a mall in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Dan Karpenchuk, reporting from Toronto for NPR, reports that one person was found dead and three others taken into custody on Friday by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in connection with the alleged plot, which authorities say was not related to Islamic terrorism. The suspects reportedly planned to kill as many people as possible before committing suicide.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

A winter storm that has already dumped up to 8 inches of snow in parts of Michigan is set to bring blizzard conditions to much of the Northeast this weekend.

According to The Weather Channel, brutal winds, bitterly cold temperatures and lots of snow along the Eastern Seaboard from Long Island to Maine. New York and Philadelphia are among the cities under winter weather advisories.

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