Sean Crawford


Advisory Board Ex-Officio


Sean has led WUIS' news operations since the fall of 2009. He replaced the only other person to do so in the station's history, Rich Bradley. Prior to taking over the News Department, Sean worked as Statehouse Bureau Chief for WUIS and other Illinois Public Radio stations. He spent more than a dozen years on the capitol beat.

Sean  began his broadcasting career at his hometown station in Herrin, Illinois while still in high school.  It was there he learned to cover local government, courts and anything else that made the news.  He spent time in the Joliet area as News Director and Operations Manager for a radio station and worked for a chain of weekly newspapers for two years.  Along with news coverage, he reported heavily on sports and did on-air play by play. 

Sean holds a Master's Degree in Public Affairs Reporting from the University of Illinois Springfield. 

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.  Not a very pretty name.  But it's becoming more likely you'll be seeing this invasive species around your home.  They are showing up in more parts of Illinois.  And, that's raising concerns.

The U.S. Geological Survey places Illinois at a high risk for a major quake in the next 50 years. Portions of the state are in the New Madrid and Wabash Valley Seismic Zones.

An international earthquake drill is scheduled this Thursday to get people ready in case "the big one" strikes.

The Great ShakeOut will stress the action "Drop, Cover, And Hold On" to help avoid injuries from falling items and debris. 

Patti Thompson, with the Illinois Emergency Management Agency, admits people don't always think about earthquake preparedness.

  Illinois wind farms will bring more than 6 billion dollars to the state economy over their lifespan.  That’s according to a new study by Illinois State University.  Researchers factored in property taxes, jobs, and payment to land owners.  David Loomis, Director of the Center for Renewable Energy, says jobs are particularly affected.  

"During the construction phase, there's a lot of activity and people get employed.  There are about 2,500 jobs that are supported during that construction phase.  And about 226 long term jobs coming during operational phase," he says.   

"Garden" By HomeSpot HQ / (CC X 2.0)

A plan sitting on the Illinois governor's desk could protect gardeners and some of the places they get seeds.

Seed libraries and seed swaps have become more popular as a way for gardeners to share. However, in some other states, regulations can effectively shut them down. 

Those consumer protections are primarily meant for commercial seed sellers and can require expensive testing to make sure the product is what it claims to be.

Studies show prisoners who stay connected with their families have lower recidivism.  Yet, the cost of keeping in touch is proving quite high for many.  Prison phone call rates are unregulated.