Tom Huizenga

Tom Huizenga is a music producer, reporter and blogger for NPR Music. He hosts NPR's classical music blog Deceptive Cadence.

A regular contributor of stories about classical music on NPR's news programs, Huizenga regularly introduces intriguing new classical CDs to listeners on the weekend version of All Things Considered. He contributes to NPR Music's "Song of the Day."

During his time at NPR, Huizenga spent seven years as a producer, writer and editor for NPR's Peabody Award-winning daily classical music magazine Performance Today, and for the programs SymphonyCast and World of Opera. He produced the live broadcast of Gershwin's Porgy & Bess from Washington National Opera at the Kennedy Center, concerts from NPR's Studio 4A and performances on the road at Summerfest La Jolla, the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival and New York's Le Poisson Rouge.

Huizenga's radio career began at the University of Michigan, where he graduated in 1986. During his four year tenure, he regularly hosted several radio programs (opera, jazz, free-form, experimental radio) at Ann Arbor's WCBN. As a student in the Enthnomusicology department, Huizenga studied and performed traditional court music from Indonesia. He also studied English Literature and voice, while writing for the university's newspaper.

After college Huizenga took his love of music and broadcasting to New Mexico, where he served as music director for NPR member station KRWG, in Las Cruces, and taught radio production at New Mexico State University.

Huizenga lives in Takoma Park, MD, with his wife Valeska Hilbig, a public affairs director at the Smithsonian. In his spare time he writes about music for the Washington Post, overloads on concerts and movies and swings a tennis racket wildly on many local courts.

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Classics in Concert
9:10 am
Fri April 6, 2012

Daniel Hope: A Renaissance Man In Savannah

Daniel Hope occupies his time performing, recording, writing, shooting videos and running music festivals.
Frank Stewart Savannah Music festival

Originally published on Mon June 23, 2014 2:35 pm

Even in this age of marathon multitaskers, British violinist Daniel Hope stands out.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:49 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Takacs Quartet: A Slice Of Schubert And A Bartok Palindrome

The Takacs Quartet played Bartók and Schubert last week at the Savannah Music Festival.
Frank Stewart Savannah Music Festival

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 8:43 am

(All this week, we're featuring concerts from the ongoing Savannah Music Festival.)

The Takács Quartet traveled to the Savannah Music Festival to play Bela Bartók's knotty, challenging String Quartet No. 4. But how did they warm up the crowd? With a slice of insistent, lyrical Schubert.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:48 am
Mon April 2, 2012

Beethoven's 10th Symphony: For Real?

Did Beethoven write a 10th symphony that was lost to history?
Clemens Bilan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 9:33 pm

Everyone knows Beethoven wrote nine symphonies, right? Or did he? Undiscovered manuscripts keep popping up all the time. Uncovering a lost 10th symphony by Beethoven would surely give the classical music world something to shout about.

It could happen — at least it could according to our colleagues over at Weekend Edition Sunday. Reporter Naomi Lewin carefully unfolds the mysterious saga of a new Beethoven discovery, as a part of our April 1 news coverage.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:44 am
Thu March 29, 2012

Talk Like An Opera Geek: Savoring The Bel Canto Sound

Maria Callas, a masterful bel canto singer, performs in the title role of Bellini's Norma in Paris, May 23, 1964.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 28, 2012 11:55 am

Talk Like An Opera Geek attempts to decode the intriguing and intimidating lexicon of the opera house.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:53 pm
Thu March 22, 2012

Stick Your Head Into A High Performance Harpsichord

Andreas Staier plays Bach's Goldberg Variations on a copy of this famously grand harpsichord built in 1734 by Hieronymus Albrecht Hass currently housed in Hamburg, Germany.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Thu March 22, 2012 8:32 am

All week, we're exploring J.S. Bach's Goldberg Variations.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:50 pm
Wed March 21, 2012

The Official Goldberg Variations Puzzler

Bach's Goldberg Variations is something of an intricate puzzle in and of itself.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 1:24 pm

All week, we're exploring Bach's "Goldberg Variations."

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Deceptive Cadence
2:50 pm
Wed March 21, 2012

Lara Downes' New Viewpoints On Old Variations

Lara Downes plays contemporary takes on Bach's iconic Goldberg Variations in NPR's studio 4A.
Doriane Raiman NPR

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 8:16 am

All week, we're exploring J.S. Bach's Goldberg Variations.

Pianist Lara Downes has had Bach's Goldberg Variations on her mind for quite some time. The music soothed her to sleep as a kid, it fascinated her as a young pianist and it's a subject of conversation on her new blog.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:12 pm
Mon March 12, 2012

Concert Calamities: When Bad Things Happen To Good Musicians

From problematic pianos to self-destructing violins, almost anything can happen onstage.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 10:24 am

Some people go to auto races secretly hoping to see a crash. You wouldn't go to a concert for that reason, but with live music you really never know what might happen.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:35 am
Thu March 8, 2012

Talk Like An Opera Geek: Popping Opera's Bloated Bubble

Soprano Veronique Gens and tenor Joseph Kaiser star in a production of Gluck's Alceste at the 2010 Aix-en-Provence Festival.
Anne-Christine Poujoulat AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 8, 2012 10:41 am

Talk Like An Opera Geek attempts to decode the intriguing and intimidating lexicon of the opera house.

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Deceptive Cadence
4:02 pm
Tue March 6, 2012

Witold Lutoslawski: Always Searching For A New Sound

Pioneering Polish composer Witold Lutosławski struggled to find his musical voice.
L. Kowalski Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue March 6, 2012 11:01 am

It wasn't always easy for Polish composer Witold Lutosławski to find his musical voice.

His Symphonic Variations, which opens this third disc in a series of Lutosławski's music, was shunned by a Warsaw Conservatory professor in the late 1930s. Not understanding the young student's score, the teacher, Witold Maliszewski, said, "For me your work is ugly."

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