Véronique LaCapra

Science reporter Véronique LaCapra first caught the radio bug writing commentaries for NPR affiliate WAMU in Washington, D.C. After producing her first audio documentaries at the Duke Center for Documentary Studies in N.C., she was hooked! She has done ecological research in the Brazilian Pantanal; regulated pesticides for the Environmental Protection Agency in Arlington, Va.; been a freelance writer and volunteer in South Africa; and contributed radio features to the Voice of America in Washington, D.C. She earned a Ph.D. in ecosystem ecology from the University of California in Santa Barbara, and a B.A. in environmental policy and biology from Cornell. LaCapra grew up in Cambridge, Mass., and in her mother’s home town of Auxerre, France.

illinois
6:44 am
Thu October 2, 2014

Study: Giving Teens Free Birth Control Means Fewer Unplanned Pregnancies And Abortions

IUDs and implants are 20 times more effective at preventing pregnancy than short-term birth control options like the pill, patch, or vaginal ring (pictured).

Originally published on Wed October 1, 2014 9:37 pm

Giving teenagers access to free, long-term contraception can dramatically reduce rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion. That's according to new research out of Washington University in St. Louis.

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NPR Story
4:48 am
Fri September 19, 2014

Early-Stage Wash U Vaccine Could Prevent The Most Common Hospital Infection

In hospital patients, a plastic tube called a catheter can be inserted into the bladder through the urethra, to empty the bladder of urine.

Originally published on Fri September 19, 2014 9:02 am

Researchers at Washington University have developed a new vaccine to prevent urinary tract infections caused by catheters. This type of infection is the most common of all infections that patients can get during a hospital stay.

The vaccine is still in its very early stages and has only been tested on mice.

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Science
5:35 am
Mon September 15, 2014

Wash U Study: Genetics Shows Schizophrenia Is Really Multiple Disorders

A Washington University study has linked dozens of gene networks to eight different forms of schizophrenia.

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 8:59 am

New research from Washington University suggests that schizophrenia is actually a group of eight distinct disorders, each with a different genetic basis.

The findings could eventually open the door to earlier diagnosis and treatment of this debilitating mental disorder, which affects more than 3 million people in the United States.

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Health
2:45 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Got Unwanted Prescription Drugs? Get Rid Of Them On Saturday

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 4:03 pm

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration on Saturday is sponsoring a nationwide prescription drug take-back event.

Between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., anyone can turn in their expired or unwanted medications at thousands of police stations, pharmacies, and other sites across the country, including here in St. Louis.

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Science
5:52 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Whole Genome Sequencing Is Here To Stay. What Does That Mean For Genetic Privacy?

Adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine (abbreviated ATCG) are the four nucleotide bases that make up DNA.

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 2:17 pm

Originally published on Wednesday, February 26, 2014. Updated to include audio from St. Louis on the Air.

It cost billions of dollars and took more than a decade to sequence the first human genome.

 

That was more than ten years ago. Our understanding of human genetics has advanced considerably since then, and these days anybody can find out a lot about their genetic make-up just by sending in a sample of their DNA in the mail.

 

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NPR Story
5:50 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Wash U, U of I Scientists Use 3-D Printer To Help Create Prototype Next-Gen Pacemaker

This photo shows the new cardiac device ― a thin, elastic membrane ― fitted over a rabbit's heart. The membrane is imprinted with a network of electrodes that can monitor cardiac function and deliver an electrical impulse to correct an erratic heartbeat.

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 5:12 am

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis have developed a new device that may one day help prevent heart attacks.

Unlike existing pacemakers and implantable defibrillators that are one-size-fits-all, the new device is a thin, elastic membrane designed to stretch over the heart like a custom-made glove.

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