Victor Yehling

Managing Editor

Victor Yehling is Managing Editor for WNIJ News.  He coordinates the WNIJ news team, assigns stories, offers suggestions, develops project ideas, and generally harasses our outstanding news employees.  He's a relative newcomer, joining WNIJ in July 2010, but he has 15 years prior experience as a newspaper editor and reporter plus a couple of years in TV news.  He also spent time on the dark side, working in public relations and advertising; he claims he's recovering.  Away from the station, he enjoys theater, grandchildren, board games, Kansas City Chiefs football, and preparing for retirement in rural suburban Hagarstown.

It’s a common complaint: “Illinois has the worst property taxes in the United States.”

That may be great for making political hay, but it isn’t entirely true – according to a recent study by WalletHub.com of all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Illinois ranked 50th in that study with an effective average annual property tax rate of 2.3 percent. But that’s one notch above New Jersey, which imposes an average effective property tax rate of 2.35 percent.

Some incumbents lost their seats in Tuesday’s primary election, which was marked by very low turnout in every race.

Some of Tuesday’s winners will be guaranteed victory in April because there are no qualified candidates to oppose them.

Rockford

Two Rockford City Council incumbents were pushed out of their seats by primary challengers Tuesday,

Flickr user / kristin_a (Meringue Bake Shop) "Vote!" (CC BY 2.0)

Primary elections are scheduled in a few places in northern Illinois today.

AP

The approval of controversial nominee Betsy DeVos as the next U.S. Secretary of Education took a historical twist Tuesday.

Vice President Mike Pence – barely over two weeks into his term – cast a tie-breaking vote in his Constitutional role as President of the U.S. Senate.

That was the 246th time that a vice president had to resolve a Senate deadlock, but it was the only time such a vote was cast to decide a cabinet appointment.

Declaring himself “frustrated by the slow pace of change here in Springfield,” Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner described the State of the State as needing compromise and additional reform to accomplish its goals.

He touted great “strides in ethics reform” since taking office two years ago and “modernizing and streamlining” state government and making information more accessible to citizens.

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