All Things Considered

Monday through Friday, 3pm - 7pm; Saturday and Sunday, 4pm - 5pm
  • Hosted by Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro
  • Local Host Jenna Dooley

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.  Every weekday afternoon, hosts Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro bring listeners breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  WNIJ airs a one-hour edition of the program at 4pm on Saturday and Sunday.

(U.S. Edition) U.S. authorities are reportedly looking at connections some U.S. individuals may have to South Africa's Gupta family, which is currently embroiled in a series of scandals. We'll look at the family's background and their political influence. Afterwards, we'll discuss a new report that says the aging experience will be different for younger generations. One of these changes: growing inequality. Afterwards, we'll look back at a major event in our financial history, which happened 30 years ago today. On Black Monday, the stock market experienced the largest single-day ever. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... China's economic growth data came in better than expected today, just as the ruling Communist Party's once-every-five-years conference gets underway. But can the numbers be trusted? Afterwards — it's the 30th anniversary of Black Monday, the single-biggest daily decline in U.S. stock markets. The panic then rippled across the world, leading to double digit declines in places from Australia to Spain to Hong Kong. With global markets hitting fresh highs, have we learned any lessons from the intervening three decades?

Thirty years ago this week, the Dow Jones suffered its biggest one day percentage loss ever — almost 23 percent of its value in just six and a half hours.

On Black Monday, Kenneth Polcari, now a managing director at O’Neil Securities, was a rookie trader on the New York Stock Exchange. The market “just went down, and down. It just never came up for air,” said Polcari, “Johnson & Johnson lost nearly 50 percent of its value in six and half hours.”

Your pension fund could be invested in tech

22 hours ago

The economics of the tech industry is a chain with a bunch of confusing links. Startups get their money from venture capital firms, and we've talked about how that works and why it heavily influences who becomes key players in tech and what products end up in your hands. But how do venture capital firms get their money? Limited partners, or private corporations; state, county and city entities; and universities. Now, continue to follow me down the chain.

10/19/2017: How venture capital gets its funding

22 hours ago

The tech industry’s economy hinges on venture capital. But what does venture capital’s economy hinge on? Private corporations, city entities and universities. These groups, called limited partners, fund firms with endowment money and pension funds, or part of your paycheck. On this episode of Marketplace Tech, we look into the world of limited partners.

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