All Things Considered

Monday through Friday, 3pm - 7pm; Saturday and Sunday, 4pm - 5pm
Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.  Every weekday afternoon, hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish bring listeners breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  WNIJ airs a one-hour edition of the program at 4pm on Saturday and Sunday.

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Space
3:13 pm
Sat October 29, 2011

Spy Satellite Engineer's Top Secret Is Revealed

Phil Pressel designed cameras for the government's top-secret Hexagon project. He's only recently been able to speak about his life's work.

Roger Guillemette/SPACE.com

Every day for decades, engineer Phil Pressel would come home from work and be unable to tell his wife what he'd been doing all day.

Now, Pressel is free to speak about his life's work: designing cameras for a top-secret U.S. government spy satellite. Officially known as the KH-9 Hexagon, engineers called it "Big Bird" for its massive size.

Until the government declassified it last month, Hexagon had been a secret for 46 years.

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Author Interviews
11:06 am
Sat October 29, 2011

The Funny 50: A Cavalcade Of Comic Writers

A Presidential Candidate," in which he jokingly announces that he is running for president, kicks off Andy Borowitz's comedy collection.

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Mark Twain's story "A Presidential Candidate," in which he jokingly announces that he is running for president, kicks off Andy Borowitz's comedy collection.

Ernest H. Mills Getty Images

Writer and comedian Andy Borowitz says he initially got into comedy for one simple reason: girls.

In addition to using his jokes to charm women, Borowitz has also written for The New Yorker and runs a satirical blog called The Borowitz Report. His latest project is The 50 Funniest American Writers: An Anthology of Humor from Mark Twain to The Onion.

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Monkey See
11:01 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

Justin Timberlake On Music, Comedy, And Wearing Out His NPR T-Shirt

Justin Timberlake arrives at the premiere of In Time on October 20.

Frazer Harrison Getty Images

It was almost two years ago now that Justin Timberlake, while filming The Social Network, cemented his place in the NPR collective heart by being photographed wearing our logo across his chest like a tattoo, only fabric, and temporary, and less painful. (Back then, by the way, that shirt wasn't in our shop. Now, you can have one! It's with our "best-sellers," even now.)

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Planet Money
3:42 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

Why GDP Is Like GPA

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 9:53 am

GDP contains multitudes. Everything we manufacture. Every plumber who fixed a sink, every accountant who carried the one and divided by five — all the goods and services we produced.

It was invented by a guy named Simon Kuznets during the the Great Depression, when everybody wanted to know just how bad things were.

Now the number is put out by Steve Landefeld at the government's Bureau of Economic Analysis.

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NPR's Back-Seat Book Club
3:33 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

Kids' Book Club: A 'Graveyard' Tour With Neil Gaiman

Emily Davis for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 29, 2011 5:27 pm

Welcome to the first installment of NPR's Backseat Book Club! We've invited all of our younger listeners to join us for conversations with authors of kids' books. We kicked off the club with The Graveyard Book, a thrilling Halloween treat from Neil Gaiman that won the Newbery Medal in 2009. Gaiman loves Halloween and all the creepy fun that goes along with it.

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Opinion
2:45 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

For Witty, Warm, Wonderful Advice, We Asked Beth

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Amy Dickinson writes the Ask Amy advice column for the Chicago Tribune. Her column appears in 150 newspapers across the country.

I think the best advice is simply good advice.

It's helpful, useful and delivered with respect.

Ask Beth's specialty was advising young people about relationships, sexuality, and sexual behavior. This is a tricky business because kids and teens are often misinformed — or simply uninformed.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

Week In Politics: Executive Orders; Income Inequality

Melissa Block speaks with our regular political commentators E.J. Dionne, of the Washington Post and Brookings Institution, and David Brooks, of the New York Times.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

Romney Seemingly Shifts On Climate Change

Thursday in Pittsburgh, Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney appeared to shift his position on climate change. Speaking at the Consol Energy Center, he said, "My view is that we don't know what's causing climate change on this planet." In his book No Apology and in earlier public appearances, Romney has said that he believes climate change is occurring and that humans are a contributing factor. At a campaign appearance in New Hampshire, back in August, Romney emphasized questions about the extent of the human role.

Music Interviews
3:25 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Chris Isaak Pays Tribute To Sun Studio's Golden Years

For Beyond the Sun, Chris Isaak picked classic songs that he'd been singing his whole life.

Courtesy of the artist

What if you could time-travel back to Memphis' Sun Studios in the 1950s? Behind the console would be none other than producer Sam Phillips. You might hear such classic songs as "My Happiness," "Crazy Arms" or "Walk the Line," originally recorded at Sun Studio by Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Johnny Cash, respectively.

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Opinion
3:01 pm
Thu October 27, 2011

Intelligent Design: McCarthy, Myself And A.I.

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel shakes hands with "SpaceJustin," a humanoid space robot, at last year's International Aerospace Exhibition (ILA) at the Schoenefeld airport in Berlin.

Johannes Eisele AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:24 pm

Adam Frank is an astrophysicist at the University of Rochester. He is a regular contributor to the NPR blog 13.7: Cosmos and Culture.

What is going to happen when our machines wake up? What will happen when all these computers that run our lives suddenly become intelligent and self-aware? It's a question that makes sense to ask today, as the world marks the recent passage of John McCarthy.

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