All Things Considered

Monday through Friday, 3pm - 7pm; Saturday and Sunday, 4pm - 5pm
Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.  Every weekday afternoon, hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish bring listeners breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  WNIJ airs a one-hour edition of the program at 4pm on Saturday and Sunday.

Local Host(s): 
Guy Stephens
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Composer ID: 
5187f5a3e1c80ade92b5bd89|5187f57fe1c80ade92b5bceb

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Presidential Race
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Newest Cain Accuser Holds Press Conference

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:04 pm

GOP presidential contender Herman Cain may have a difficult time getting his campaign back "on message" after a week spent responding to allegations of sexual harassment. Attorney Gloria Allred held a news conference in New York on Monday afternoon for a woman who says she was sexually harassed by Cain.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Report: Wealth Gap Widens Between Old And Young

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. We've been hearing a lot lately about the gap between rich and poor in this country. Well, now a new angle on that gap between young and old. Research out today finds that older Americans are significantly better off than seniors a generation ago, but young adults have fallen dramatically behind.

NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

A Look At The Reported Growth In Wall Street Profits

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Now, if anyone is doing well in this time of economic uncertainty, it is fair to say it is the banks. Wall Street firms earned more in the first two and a half years of the Obama administration than they did during the entire presidency of George W. Bush. That's according to a story today in the Washington Post by reporter Zach Goldfarb and he joins us now. Welcome to the program, Zach.

ZACHARY GOLDFARB: Nice to be here.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

How Does The CIA Use Social Media?

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

And it's time now for All Tech Considered. Today, a look at social media and the CIA. A group within the agency monitors Facebook updates and tweets from people overseas, up to 5 million a day. Kimberly Dozier got a rare inside look at these operations. She's the intelligence correspondent for the Associated Press, and she joins me in the studio. Welcome.

KIMBERLY DOZIER: Thank you.

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Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities
4:00 am
Mon November 7, 2011

Oklahoma Town Battles Powdery Carbon Pollution

The Continental Carbon plant sits on the southern outskirts of Ponca City, Okla. Residents blamed the plant, which produces a black dust known as carbon black, for polluting their city.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 12:55 pm

Part 2 of a four-part series, Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities

Karen Howe couldn't believe her luck. As a single mom working a minimum-wage job and living with two kids in a crowded one-bedroom apartment in Ponca City, Okla., she was desperate for a three-bedroom house and a lawn.

Howe, a member of the Ponca tribe, was offered tribal housing in a small, tree-lined subdivision of 11 homes on the southern, rural edge of the city.

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Around the Nation
4:33 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Small Elections Drawing Big Money In Some States

A few years ago, in Wake County, N.C., Kevin Hill wanted to get involved in his community, so he ran for his local school board.

The campaign team consisting of Hill and his wife, with the help of some friends, raised about $6,000; he won the seat in the 2007 election. He's hoping to retain that seat in a runoff election Tuesday, but this time his campaign is a little bigger.

"[It went] from me and my wife to about 300 people," Hill says. "It's been mind-boggling to me that, for a school board race that is nonpartisan, the amounts of money that has been raised."

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Three-Minute Fiction
2:21 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Three-Minute Fiction Winners: Where Are They Now?

Courtesy of Zach Brockhouse

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 5:59 pm

Three-Minute Fiction is All Things Considered's creative writing contest where our listeners submit an original short story that can be read in about three minutes — 600 words — or less. After weeks of reading a couple thousand submissions, a judge picks a winning story. Over the last two years, contestants have submitted about 29,000 stories, and only six have won.

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Latin America
2:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

In Nicaragua, Ortega Poised For Re-Election

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 5:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

It's Election Day in Nicaragua where President Daniel Ortega is running for an unprecedented third term. The country's constitution sets a two-term limit, but the Supreme Court declared that unconstitutional. The longtime Sandinistan leader has been leading in the polls. NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from Managua.

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Latin America
2:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

Nicaragua, Guatemala: '80s Rebels Seek Leadership

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 5:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Nicaragua isn't the only country in Central America holding elections today. In Guatemala, people are also headed to the polls to choose a new president. And in both countries, the elections are fraught with history.

Back in the 1980s, Guatemala and Nicaragua were facing civil war and revolution. Twenty-five years later, both countries are still embattled but with different issues.

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Interviews
2:00 pm
Sun November 6, 2011

What Do Occupy Wall Street Protesters Want?

Originally published on Sun November 6, 2011 5:59 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

Occupy Wall Street is in its second month of protest, and the frustration with financial big wigs continues to grow. Tomorrow's protesters will track 11 miles from Upper Manhattan to Lower Manhattan, ending in Zuccotti Park, the place where it all started seven weeks ago. They're calling the walk End to End for 99%.

These events are becoming a familiar sight to bankers looking down from their high-rise windows onto the tent city below. But what's Wall Street really thinking about the so-called 99 percent just outside their offices?

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