All Things Considered

Monday through Friday, 3pm - 7pm; Saturday and Sunday, 4pm - 5pm
Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.  Every weekday afternoon, hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish bring listeners breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  WNIJ airs a one-hour edition of the program at 4pm on Saturday and Sunday.

Local Host(s): 
Guy Stephens
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Composer ID: 
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Monkey See
2:03 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

'100 Yards To Glory': What Eli Manning Told Bob Costas About His Pores

Bob Costas, co-author of a new book and DVD set counting down the greatest moments in NFL history.
NBC Universal Photo Bank

On today's All Things Considered, Robert Siegel poses an important question to Bob Costas, one of the authors of a new book about the greatest moments in football: With football so popular and beloved and money-making, why is baseball still considered our national pastime? What does football have to do to get a little love?

"Hey, leave baseball something," Costas says of the special, nostalgic language with which we often speak of it. "In every other measurable way, football has surpassed it."

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Tue November 8, 2011

Paterno Cancels Weekly News Conference

Guy Raz speaks with NPR's Mike Pesca about the growing scandal in the Penn State football program. Longtime coach Joe Paterno abruptly canceled his weekly news conference Tuesday, amid reports that members of the school's board are pushing for him to step down.

Economy
4:39 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Why Is Food Stamp Usage Rising So Fast?

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:04 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The number of Americans who use food stamps is now close to 46 million, that's 15 percent of the population. The program is formally known as SNAP these days, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. And the number of people who depend on it to buy groceries has grown substantially, even since the recession was officially declared over, back in June of 2009.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Report: Wealth Gap Widens Between Old And Young

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. We've been hearing a lot lately about the gap between rich and poor in this country. Well, now a new angle on that gap between young and old. Research out today finds that older Americans are significantly better off than seniors a generation ago, but young adults have fallen dramatically behind.

NPR's Jennifer Ludden reports.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

A Look At The Reported Growth In Wall Street Profits

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Now, if anyone is doing well in this time of economic uncertainty, it is fair to say it is the banks. Wall Street firms earned more in the first two and a half years of the Obama administration than they did during the entire presidency of George W. Bush. That's according to a story today in the Washington Post by reporter Zach Goldfarb and he joins us now. Welcome to the program, Zach.

ZACHARY GOLDFARB: Nice to be here.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

How Does The CIA Use Social Media?

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:04 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

And it's time now for All Tech Considered. Today, a look at social media and the CIA. A group within the agency monitors Facebook updates and tweets from people overseas, up to 5 million a day. Kimberly Dozier got a rare inside look at these operations. She's the intelligence correspondent for the Associated Press, and she joins me in the studio. Welcome.

KIMBERLY DOZIER: Thank you.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Italy Teeters As Berlusconi Refuses To Step Down

Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi denied again that he was about to resign on Monday, an announcement that sent Italy's borrowing costs close to a level most analysts believe is unsustainable. Berlusconi is seen by many Italians as a major obstacle to Italy's escape from its current financial woes. He faces a number of difficult votes in parliament this week, but if forced to step down, he'll call new elections.

Law
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Michael Jackson's Personal Physician Found Guilty

Robert Siegel talks with NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates about Monday's verdict in the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray. Michael Jackson's personal physician was found guilty.

Presidential Race
2:00 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Newest Cain Accuser Holds Press Conference

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 7:04 pm

GOP presidential contender Herman Cain may have a difficult time getting his campaign back "on message" after a week spent responding to allegations of sexual harassment. Attorney Gloria Allred held a news conference in New York on Monday afternoon for a woman who says she was sexually harassed by Cain.

Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities
4:00 am
Mon November 7, 2011

Oklahoma Town Battles Powdery Carbon Pollution

The Continental Carbon plant sits on the southern outskirts of Ponca City, Okla. Residents blamed the plant, which produces a black dust known as carbon black, for polluting their city.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Thu November 10, 2011 12:55 pm

Part 2 of a four-part series, Poisoned Places: Toxic Air, Neglected Communities

Karen Howe couldn't believe her luck. As a single mom working a minimum-wage job and living with two kids in a crowded one-bedroom apartment in Ponca City, Okla., she was desperate for a three-bedroom house and a lawn.

Howe, a member of the Ponca tribe, was offered tribal housing in a small, tree-lined subdivision of 11 homes on the southern, rural edge of the city.

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