All Things Considered

Monday through Friday, 3pm - 7pm; Saturday and Sunday, 4pm - 5pm
Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.  Every weekday afternoon, hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish bring listeners breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  WNIJ airs a one-hour edition of the program at 4pm on Saturday and Sunday.

Local Host(s): 
Guy Stephens
Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187f5a3e1c80ade92b5bd89|5187f57fe1c80ade92b5bceb

Pages

The Picture Show
2:06 pm
Fri November 4, 2011

At 75, 'Life' Revisits Its First Cover Story

Alfred Eisenstaedt Life

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:17 am

Seventy-five years ago this month, Henry Luce, who had launched Time magazine in the 1920s, created his third great magazine: Life. Over the coming years it would come to be known as the weekly with the most and the best photographs. It would show Americans what war and peace looked like. There were photographs in Life of the Spanish Civil War and of V-J Day in Times Square that are rare cases for which the term "iconic" truly makes sense. And there were dozens of others, too.

Read more
Books
2:07 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

'The Art Museum': A Case For The Printed Book?

If The Art Museum were a real museum and not just a book, there would hardly be need for another. At 18 pounds and 922 pages, the expansive book is organized into thematic "galleries," and within those "rooms" dedicated to solo artists, like Picasso.
Phaidon

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 2:01 pm

Publisher Phaidon's latest art endeavor, The Art Museum, presents the collection of an imaginary museum with the greatest works from art collections around the globe. That museum would have to be imaginary — the book itself weighs in at 18 pounds, measures 16 1/2 by 12 5/8 inches and runs nearly 1,000 pages.

The Art Museum is divided into 25 galleries, as opposed to chapters, and each gallery is divided into several rooms, which all told include reproductions of more than 2,700 works.

Read more
NPR Story
2:00 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

Why Put The Bailout To A Referendum In Greece?

Robert Siegel speaks to Mark Mazower, a professor of history at Columbia University and an expert on contemporary Greece, about the tensions between democracy and the need for decisive action in dealing with the euro crisis. Mazower says that the speed of financial markets, and the slowness of the democratic process, has increased this tension during the crisis.

World
2:00 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

Papandreou Nixes Referendum On Bailout

The Greek government is teetering on the brink of collapse Thursday, following the decision of Prime Minister George Papandreou to call off a referendum on the Europe bailout package for his country. The finance minister and other party colleagues have turned against Papandreou, amid talk of a national coalition government to prepare for new elections. Guy Raz talks to Joanna Kakissis, who has the latest from Athens.

Deceptive Cadence
1:52 pm
Thu November 3, 2011

Hey, Kids, It's Vinny Pookh Time! Cartoon Music From The USSR

1969's Vinny Pookh V Gosti ("Winnie The Pooh Goes Visiting"), with music by Mieczysław Weinberg.
YouTube

Twentieth-century Russian music is often thought of as dark and brooding, a reflection of life under the thumb of a brutal state. When it was funny, it usually had a kind of gallows humor.

Yet many of the same composers whose concert works often reflected a dark reality also wrote cartoon music for kids. Thursday night, the Brooklyn Philharmonic is playing some of these cartoon scores in Brighton Beach — the heart of the Russian-American community in New York City. For some of its creators, cartoon music offered a certain kind of escape.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:02 pm
Wed November 2, 2011

Punk Rock Grows Up, And Grays, In 'Other F Word'

Punk rockers like Lars Frederiksen of Rancid, shown with his son, struggle to reconcile their rebellious identities with their roles as devoted dads.
Oscilloscope Laboratories

Originally published on Wed November 2, 2011 5:40 pm

Punk rock bands like Blink-182 and Rancid are no strangers to obscenity — it's an integral part of their anti-establishment vernacular. But as the figureheads of raucous teenage rebellion age, they've had to encounter a different kind of "F-word"-- fatherhood. A new documentary film explores this paradox, as serious punk-rock performers make the transition from rebels to responsible family men.

Read more
NPR Story
2:00 pm
Wed November 2, 2011

McCourt, MLB Reach Agreement To Sell Dodgers

Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt and Major League Baseball have reached an agreement to put the team up for sale. While McCourt's ownership has been widely seen as a disaster for the club, it will still likely sell for nearly three times what he paid for it.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Wed November 2, 2011

G-20 Set To Meet After Referendum Announcement

NPR's Eric Westervelt is in Cannes, France, where the leaders of the G-20 industrialized nations are due to meet on Thursday. He's watching developments in the eurozone after Monday's surprise announcement of a referendum on the bailout deal in Greece. Robert Siegel talks to Eric for more.

National Security
2:00 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

Senators Grill Officials On ATF Operations

Senators grill a high-level Justice Department official about why they didn't do or say more about two Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosive gun trafficking operations that resulted in hundreds of guns going missing in Mexico.

Your Money
2:00 pm
Tue November 1, 2011

BofA Cancels Plans For Debit Card Fee

Bank of America canceled plans to impose a $5 monthly fee on customers who use debit cards in stores and restaurants. The bank's original decision to charge the fee came under sharp attack from consumer groups and individual customers.

Pages