Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
  • Local Host Jenna Dooley

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Ways to Connect

The top four Paralympic runners competing in the 1,500-meter final on Sunday beat the final time posted by Olympic gold medalist Matt Centrowitz Jr. at the Rio Games less than a month ago. The visually impaired runners did not use assisted technologies or guides.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Erin Strout of Runner’s World magazine about the record-breaking runners, and other standout Paralympic performances.

Managers have many reasons to say “no” to employees, but it can be difficult to work for someone who always says “no” to new ideas.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with author and employee engagement expert David Sturt about why saying “yes” more often might be better for business.

Don’t trust the polls. Trust the average. That’s the general advice from most pollsters or politicos when reading presidential predictions.

But even so, not all polls are created equal.

Results differ based on who is being selected for a poll, whether it is a national or state poll, the number of candidates on the ballot and how close the poll is to the election.

What Does The Electoral College Do?

Sep 13, 2016

Voters go to the polls on Nov. 8. But the 538 members of the Electoral College vote on Dec. 19.

They’re supposed to follow the popular vote, but there’s always a chance a few might not. And what happens if Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are tied?

Political scientist Kyle Dell joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young for a refresher on the Electoral College, and how members of Congress might break a potential tie.

Interview Highlights: Kyle Dell

On the Electoral College’s function

The world’s wilderness areas have experienced catastrophic losses in the past two decades, according to a new study published Friday in the journal “Current Biology.”

Comparing current maps with those from the 1990s, researchers concluded that more than 3.3 million square kilometers, or about one-tenth of the world’s total wilderness, has been lost, raising deep concerns about what effect that has on local economies and global climate change.

Pages