Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
2:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Wimbledon Watch: New Faces As Women's Tennis Makes A Comeback

Sloane Stephens of the United States in action during her Ladies' Singles first round match against Maria Kirilenko of Russia on day one of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club at Wimbledon on June 23, 2014 in London, England. (Steve Bardens/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 3:42 pm

Sports correspondent Tom Perrotta, writes that “women’s tennis has finally found its future.” And it’s beyond the hands of Maria Sharapova, or Serena and Venus Williams.

American Sloane Stevens, 21, lost on day one of Wimbledon yesterday, but 18-year-old Taylor Townsend plays today. They’re both up-and-coming players to watch, along with 20-year-old Canadian Eugenie Bouchard, who also plays today.

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NPR Story
1:59 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Win, Lose or Draw, U.S. Can Still Advance In World Cup

U.S. forward Clint Dempsey scores during a Group G football match between USA and Portugal at the Amazonia Arena in Manaus during the 2014 FIFA World Cup on June 22, 2014. (Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images)

There were 30 seconds left to play and the United States team was beating Portugal 2 to 1. The majority pro-American crowd of more than 40,000 at last night’s World Cup game in Brazil were ready to party, but it wasn’t to be.

Portugal scored with less than half a minute to go, and now the U.S. looks ahead to Thursday evening’s game against Germany to determine its World Cup future.

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NPR Story
1:59 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Louisville Mayor 'Not Opposed' To Minimum Wage Increase

Mayor Greg Fischer of Louisville, Kentucky says he "would support" a gradual increase in the minimum wage, but doing so "has not been a big topic of conversation in our city." (www.louisvilleky.gov)

The U.S. Conference of Mayors is wrapping up its annual meeting in Dallas, Texas. The annual conference covers urban policies ranging including climate change, education, same-sex marriage, inequality and economic growth.

Raising the minimum wage was much discussed, because Seattle recently raised its minimum wage to $15 an hour.

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NPR Story
1:59 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

The Ghostly Sound Of The Theremin

Jon Bernhardt playing the theremin in the WBUR studios. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Even if you’re not familiar with the musical instrument called the theremin, chances are you’ve heard its ghostly sound. The theremin is unique because of how it’s played: you make music without touching it. Theremin player Jon Bernhardt discusses the instrument and plays some music for Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer.

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NPR Story
3:43 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

More Analysis Of Obama's Remarks On Iraq

President Obama laid out his plan to help Iraq today, including sending up to 300 military advisers to the country to train local military, and sending Secretary of State John Kerry to the region. But the president said several times that there would be no more U.S. combat troops in Iraq.

Here & Now’s Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson speak with Rick Klein, political director for ABC News, and Robert Scales, retired U.S. Army major general and former commandant of the U.S. Army War College.

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NPR Story
3:43 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Pro-Government Supporters Struggle After Thailand Coup

More than 100,000 Cambodians have fled Thailand in recent days. They’re apparently leaving because they fear Thailand’s new military rulers are about to crack down on migrant workers in Thailand. Many of those workers are Cambodians.

The new military rulers deny they are about to crackdown on those workers, but there’s no denying they are suppressing any resistance to their rule. This is part of the fallout from last month’s coup, which ousted the former government of Yingluck Shinawatra.

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NPR Story
3:43 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Where Oil Workers Go, The 'Sticker Bus' Follows

The Sticker Bus is a traveling sticker store that markets mainly to oilfield workers. (Mónica Ortiz Uribe)

Americans are expected to his the road in droves this summer, maybe heading to national parks or the beach. That includes Josie Goeres, who spends a lot of time on the road. She’s in New Mexico now, chasing after her customers for her very unusual day job. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Monica Ortiz Uribe of Fronteras Desk reports.

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NPR Story
2:59 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Dick Cheney's Op-Ed And The Return Of The Neocon

Former U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney listens as his wife Lynne Cheney speaks about her book "James Madison: A Life Reconsidered" May 12, 2014 in Washington, DC. ( Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 8:56 pm

Architects and proponents of the Iraq War are now back with criticism of President Obama’s foreign policy.

Leading the group is former Vice President Dick Cheney, who co-wrote an op-ed with his daughter Liz Cheney in today’s Wall Street Journal. The subtitle reads, “Rarely has a U.S. President been so wrong about so much at the expense of so many.”

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs magazine, discusses what neoconservatives are saying about President Obama and Iraq with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

In 'The Rover,' Guy Pearce Takes A Bleak Road Trip

Guy Pearce is pictured in a still from “The Rover.” (A24)

The new film “The Rover” is set in Australia, 10 years after the country has collapsed and degenerated into barbarism.

English-born Australian actor Guy Pearce plays a drifter whose car is stolen and who’s determined to get it back, no matter what the cost.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

American Airlines To End Most Flights To Venezuela

A man walks next to an American Airlines ticket sale office in Caracas on June 17, 2014. American Airlines announced earlier today that it will cut almost 80 percent of its weekly flights to Venezuela, on account of a USD 750 million debt that the Venezuelan government holds with them. The government of President Nicolas Maduro owes several international airlines USD 4,200 million, which made two of them close down their operations in Venezuela and others to implement deep cutbacks. (LEO RAMIREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 7:23 am

American Airlines is cutting nearly 80 percent of its flights between the U.S. and Venezuela starting in July, because the Venezuelan government owes it $750 million dollars in ticket revenue.

American is the largest foreign airline serving Venezuela, and it’s just the latest carrier to suspend most or all flights to the country.

The carrier is also scrapping all direct flights to Venezuela from New York, Dallas and San Juan, Puerto Rico, and will only fly there from Miami.

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