Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
11:55 am
Wed July 17, 2013

What Are People Drinking Instead Of Coke?

A restored Coca-Cola mural in Georgia. (Brent Moore/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 4:05 pm

Coca-Cola reported disappointing second-quarter results, citing bad weather and weak global growth.

But the company has steadily lost consumers in the United States, as people become more wary of consuming sugary drinks.

So what are Americans drinking instead?

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NPR Story
11:50 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Busting The Quinoa Myth

Tri-color quinoa. (avlxyz/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 1:54 pm

If you’re part of the health-conscious foodie crowd, there’s a good chance you eat quinoa.

Five years ago, a lot of people couldn’t pronounce it and had never heard of it. But a boom in the popularity of this so-called Andean “super-grain” is pushing demand sky-high.

As Americans eat more of it, there are suggestions that people who live closest to quinoa — the indigenous people of the Andes — are being deprived of the food because the price has gone so high.

But NPR food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey says the truth is complicated.

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NPR Story
11:40 am
Wed July 17, 2013

Rep. John Lewis Pushes For Updated Voting Rights Act

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., accompanied by fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus express disappointment in the Supreme Court's decision on Shelby County v. Holder that invalidates Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 4:05 pm

The Senate Judiciary Committee will hear testimony on Wednesday on the future of the Voting Rights Act. In June, the Supreme Court nullified a key provision of the act, ruling the law was outdated.

The decision ended the requirement for more than a dozen states to clear new election laws with the Department of Justice.

Now it’s up to Congress to update the formula used to determine which states need extra oversight, based on their history of past voting rights abuses.

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NPR Story
11:35 am
Wed July 17, 2013

In China, Another Food Scandal Makes Headlines

BBC correspondent Celia Hatton holds up the results of a home food test, indicating that the milk is contaminated. (BBC video screenshot)

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 4:05 pm

In China, it seems to be “another week, another food scandal.” Chinese citizens are worn down with news of contaminated food — including toxic milk powder, poisonous rice and fake food.

Unscrupulous restaurants and food stalls have been caught selling everything from fake eggs made of gelatine, to the latest scandal — duck meat passed off as lamb.

So how are the citizens reacting? They’re coming up with their own solutions to deal with the crisis, as the BBC’s Celia Hatton reports from Beijing.

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NPR Story
3:19 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Renee Graham's Off-The-Radar Playlist

Quadron's new album "Avalanche" is one of three that Here & Now pop culture critic Renee Graham recommends.

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 12:50 pm

The Los Angeles duo Quadron released their new album “Avalanche” back in May, but it hasn’t made a lot of waves.

And that’s a shame, according to Here & Now pop culture critic Renee Graham, she says because it’s the perfect album for summer listening.

“It’s so light, it’s breezy, it’s easy,” Graham said. “It’s beautifully produced music.”

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NPR Story
3:19 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Could Technology Upgrades Help Stop Welfare Fraud?

Pictured is the Massachusetts State House, where some lawmakers are calling for welfare reform to address controversies over welfare fraud. (Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 12:40 pm

Officials in Massachusetts are investigating whether to file criminal or civil charges after an auditor’s report last month found that the state had handed out $18 million in questionable benefits — including welfare — to more than 1,000 dead people.

Michigan’s governor Rick Snyder just signed a law to make sure that dead people are not eligible for food assistance.

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NPR Story
3:19 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Is Yahoo Making A Comeback?

This image released by NBC shows Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer appearing on NBC News' "Today" show, Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013 in New York to introduce the website's redesign. (Peter Kramer/NBC via AP)

Is Yahoo making a comeback? The company’s stock is up nearly 36 percent this year.

Investors have had high hopes since the arrival of CEO Marissa Mayer, who joined Yahoo from Google.

Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal joins us to talk about how the company is doing overall.

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NPR Story
11:50 am
Tue July 16, 2013

'Boy Of Baraka' Brings Sweet Change To Baltimore

Detail of Taharka Brothers Ice Cream poster. (Taharka Bros.)

Back in 2005 we introduced you to a group of young men from inner-city Baltimore who spent a year studying in Kenya as part of a small education program called the Baraka School.

The idea was to get the boys away from the crime and drugs in their neighborhood. Their experiences were featured in a documentary called “The Boys of Baraka.”

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NPR Story
11:45 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Britain Anticipates Royal Baby

As part of a publicity stunt, people from a bookmakers office dressed as Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, right and a British Guardsman, left, stand with a placard with the odds for the name of the royal baby as they pose for the media outside St. Mary's Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London, Wednesday, July 3, 2013. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)

Bookies are taking bets on the future King or Queen of England: gender, weight, name — even future university and profession.

They’ve hauled in $1.5 million — a record for a non-sports event.

Memorabilia has hit the shelves too — “I love Aunt Pippa” bibs, the “baby duo” pink and blue nail polish kits, “royal baby” cookie tins.

Peter Hunt, the BBC’s royal correspondent, joins us from St. Mary’s Hospital in London where Duchess Kate is expected to give birth.

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NPR Story
11:40 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Australian PM Changes Carbon Tax Ahead Of Election

Australian prime minister Kevin Rudd speaks to the media on June 26, 2013. (Rick Rycroft/AP)

Australia’s Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said Tuesday a deeply unpopular carbon tax will be replaced by a less-severe emissions trading scheme a year ahead of schedule, in a bid to lower power bills for households as a tight national election looms.

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