Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
2:56 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Researcher: Kids' Courting Behavior Increasingly Explicit, Unhealthy

A girl texts on a bench. (James Offer/Flickr)

New research shows that boys are increasingly using sexually explicit social media messages to flirt, and it may be hurting them, as much as the girls who receive it.

We’ve long known about sexting: when kids use sexually provocative language and pictures.

But after four years of collecting interviews from students ages 4 to 18, their parents and their teachers, clinical psychologist Catherine Steiner-Adair, a Harvard instructor, has concluded that the courting behavior children now use is much more aggressive and sexual than it used to be.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Teen Romance Flicks Through The Ages

A scene from the romance film, The Spectacular Now (specatularnowmovie.com)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:58 pm

The new film “The Spectacular Now” has gotten Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr thinking about teen romance films through the years.

He shares some of his favorites with us, including “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” “Say Anything…,” “Pretty in Pink” and “West Side Story.”

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Al-Qaida Surges Into Syria

This Jan. 11, 2013 citizen journalism image shows rebels from al-Qaida affiliated Jabhat al-Nusra waving their brigade flag as they stand on a Syrian air force helicopter, at Taftanaz air base that was captured by the rebels, in Idlib province, northern Syria. (Edlib News Network ENN via AP)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:58 pm

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has always blamed the conflict in Syria on terrorists, even when it started as a popular uprising.

Now, he might finally be right. An affiliate of al-Qaida in Iraq is surging into Syria. It’s called the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

This new group is in competition with the original Syrian al-Qaida affiliate, Jabhat al-Nusra, but they are seemingly aligned — along with rebel groups — in the effort to oust Assad.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Why ESPN Reigns Supreme In Covering Sports

Ryan Phelan rehearses on the set of ESPN's SportsCenter at ESPN's headquarters in Bristol, Conn., Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. (Bob Child/AP)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:58 pm

ESPN is the champion of sports media. If you look at the numbers, the 34-year-old network does reign supreme when it comes to covering sports.

The network’s value is estimated between $40 billion and $60 billion — that’s at least 20 times bigger than the New York Times Company.

Just this month, more than four million people watched ESPN’s “NASCAR Spring Cup,” making it the top cable sporting event of the week.

So how does ESPN live up to its tagline of “The Worldwide Leader in Sports”?

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NPR Story
3:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

To Get Kids Into The Kitchen, Teach Them To Cook

Kids make "Little Lasagnas" from the cookbook "Chop Chop: The Kids Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family." (Carl Tremblay/Simon & Schuster)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:11 pm

Sally Sampson founded ChopChop magazine to get kids to eat healthier by getting them interested in cooking.

The magazine won a James Beard award earlier this year and this week, Sampson published the book “Chop Chop: The Kids Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family.”

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NPR Story
3:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Economic Independence Is Transforming India's Marriage Culture

(Meghdut Gorai/Flickr)

A rapidly changing world is altering the lives of millions of women.

In India, the rising economic wherewithal of a new generation of women is transforming an institution as old as the country itself: marriage.

NPR’s Julie McCarthy has this report on Indian match-making with a modern twist.

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NPR Story
3:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

European Union Emerges From Recession

After a record 18-month slump, the European Union is coming out of a recession.

Numbers released today show three-tenths of a percent growth for the second quarter of the year.

While that may not sound like a lot, it is a signal that a much-needed recovery to pull the eurozone out of its three-and-a-half-year debt crisis may be here.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Legendary Steinway Piano Company Set To Change Hands

(Wexner Center/Flicker)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:20 pm

The 160-year-old piano maker, Steinway, is set to change hands. Last month, a private equity firm emerged as the likely buyer.

That was until today, when hedge fund manager John Paulson made an offer of $500 million. The billionaire now looks set to take control of one of the oldest manufacturers in the country.

But, Steinway’s workers don’t think a change of ownership will mean much of a change for them.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Do Leaked Albums And Songs Hurt Or Help Artists?

An image from the cover of Lady Gaga's latest album, "Artpop." (Lady Gaga)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:20 pm

Katy Perry‘s new single “Roar” from her upcoming album “Prism” and Lady Gaga’s latest track “Applause” from her new album “ARTPOP,” both were leaked over the weekend. The artists and their labels have very different initial reactions.

Lady Gaga called upon fans to report leaks for removal, while Katy Perry simply tweeted “Looks like there’s a tiger on the loose!!!”

Ultimately, both songs were released early.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

When It's Not Alzheimer’s: Little-Known Illness Mimics Dementia

Jim Lampert, right, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, but his wife Terrie, left, found a specialist who diagnosed him with normal pressure hydrocephalus. (Screenshot from Boston Globe video)

The last thing most patients do when they receive an Alzheimer’s diagnosis is seek another diagnosis.

But research shows that up to 5 percent of dementia cases are misdiagnosed cases of a treatable but largely unknown condition called “normal pressure hydrocephalus.”

It is theorized that NPH arises from excess fluid building up in the brain. The cure is to drain the fluid with shunts.

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