Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
2:08 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Western Kansas Farmers Face Dwindling Water Supply

Anthony Stevenson has switched many of his acres to non-irrigated farming with water becoming more scarce, but that has meant taking a financial hit. (Frank Morris/Harvest Public Media)

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 3:47 pm

A drought now in its third year in parts of western Kansas is taxing a resource that has been under pressure for decades: the High Plains Aquifer.

The aquifer is enormous, but it’s running low in places, forcing a move to dryland farming — that is, farming without the aid of irrigation.

And farmers aren’t the only ones affected.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Frank Morris of Harvest Public Media reports.

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NPR Story
2:56 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Swimming Into History

Gertrude Ederle became the first woman to swim across the English Channel on August 16, 1926. (commons.wikipedia.com)

On this day in 1926, Gertrude Ederle spent 14 hours and 31 minutes making history.

The 20-year-old from New York, who had won a gold and two bronze medals for the United States at the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris, became the first woman to swim across the English Channel.

Not only that, she beat the times of the five men who had accomplished the feat before her by nearly two hours despite straying off-course in the rough water and turning the 21-mile swim into a 35-mile adventure.

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NPR Story
2:56 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

'White Devil' Unlikely Chinatown Gang Leader

Boston gang member John Willis, who also goes by “white devil” in Cantonese, will be sentenced for federal drug and money laundering charges on Aug. 15.

Willis emerged as an unlikely white member of one of Boston’s Chinatown Asian gangs after joining a Chinese family and learning to speak Cantonese as a child.

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NPR Story
2:56 pm
Fri August 16, 2013

Researcher: Kids' Courting Behavior Increasingly Explicit, Unhealthy

A girl texts on a bench. (James Offer/Flickr)

New research shows that boys are increasingly using sexually explicit social media messages to flirt, and it may be hurting them, as much as the girls who receive it.

We’ve long known about sexting: when kids use sexually provocative language and pictures.

But after four years of collecting interviews from students ages 4 to 18, their parents and their teachers, clinical psychologist Catherine Steiner-Adair, a Harvard instructor, has concluded that the courting behavior children now use is much more aggressive and sexual than it used to be.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Teen Romance Flicks Through The Ages

A scene from the romance film, The Spectacular Now (specatularnowmovie.com)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:58 pm

The new film “The Spectacular Now” has gotten Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr thinking about teen romance films through the years.

He shares some of his favorites with us, including “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” “Say Anything…,” “Pretty in Pink” and “West Side Story.”

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Al-Qaida Surges Into Syria

This Jan. 11, 2013 citizen journalism image shows rebels from al-Qaida affiliated Jabhat al-Nusra waving their brigade flag as they stand on a Syrian air force helicopter, at Taftanaz air base that was captured by the rebels, in Idlib province, northern Syria. (Edlib News Network ENN via AP)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:58 pm

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has always blamed the conflict in Syria on terrorists, even when it started as a popular uprising.

Now, he might finally be right. An affiliate of al-Qaida in Iraq is surging into Syria. It’s called the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

This new group is in competition with the original Syrian al-Qaida affiliate, Jabhat al-Nusra, but they are seemingly aligned — along with rebel groups — in the effort to oust Assad.

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NPR Story
1:47 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Why ESPN Reigns Supreme In Covering Sports

Ryan Phelan rehearses on the set of ESPN's SportsCenter at ESPN's headquarters in Bristol, Conn., Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007. (Bob Child/AP)

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:58 pm

ESPN is the champion of sports media. If you look at the numbers, the 34-year-old network does reign supreme when it comes to covering sports.

The network’s value is estimated between $40 billion and $60 billion — that’s at least 20 times bigger than the New York Times Company.

Just this month, more than four million people watched ESPN’s “NASCAR Spring Cup,” making it the top cable sporting event of the week.

So how does ESPN live up to its tagline of “The Worldwide Leader in Sports”?

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NPR Story
3:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

To Get Kids Into The Kitchen, Teach Them To Cook

Kids make "Little Lasagnas" from the cookbook "Chop Chop: The Kids Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family." (Carl Tremblay/Simon & Schuster)

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 3:11 pm

Sally Sampson founded ChopChop magazine to get kids to eat healthier by getting them interested in cooking.

The magazine won a James Beard award earlier this year and this week, Sampson published the book “Chop Chop: The Kids Guide to Cooking Real Food With Your Family.”

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NPR Story
3:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Economic Independence Is Transforming India's Marriage Culture

(Meghdut Gorai/Flickr)

A rapidly changing world is altering the lives of millions of women.

In India, the rising economic wherewithal of a new generation of women is transforming an institution as old as the country itself: marriage.

NPR’s Julie McCarthy has this report on Indian match-making with a modern twist.

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NPR Story
3:20 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

European Union Emerges From Recession

After a record 18-month slump, the European Union is coming out of a recession.

Numbers released today show three-tenths of a percent growth for the second quarter of the year.

While that may not sound like a lot, it is a signal that a much-needed recovery to pull the eurozone out of its three-and-a-half-year debt crisis may be here.

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