Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
1:05 pm
Fri August 2, 2013

Why Not Interrupting Castro Was A Wise Legal Decision

Ariel Castro, right, speaks during the sentencing phase as defense attorney Craig Weintraub watches Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, in Cleveland. Castro was sentenced to life in prison plus 1,000 years. (Tony Dejak/AP)

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 3:59 pm

Yesterday, after convicted kidnapper and rapist Ariel Castro spoke at his sentencing hearing, Judge Michael Russo complimented one of his victims on her remarkable restraint.

Social media wasn’t as polite; it exploded with anger, after Castro said things, including that sex in the house where he held three women captive for over a decade was consensual (see transcript excerpts below).

He added that his victims were not virgins when he kidnapped them, that he was abused as a child and that he was sick.

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NPR Story
2:49 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Forecast For Back-To-School Shopping

Andy and Aimee Smith, background, and their children Ian, left, and Riley shop for back-to-school clothes during the first day of the sales tax holiday at J.C. Penney in Eastdale Mall in Montgomery, Ala. in August 2011. (Mickey Welsh/Montgomery Advertiser via AP)

The back-to-school shopping season has begun, and retailers are hoping consumers will be in the mood for clothes, shoes, back packs and computers.

The cold, rainy spring depressed sales as the old school year ended, so fingers are crossed for better results for the new academic year.

KUHF’s Andrew Schneider and NPR senior business editor Marilyn Geewax look at the mood of consumers as communities offer sales tax holidays to boost interest in shopping.

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NPR Story
2:49 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Ohio Man Gets Life Term In Kidnapping Of 3 Women

Ariel Castro, center, listens to the judge during court proceedings Friday, July 26, 2013, in Cleveland. (Tony Dejak/AP)

One of three women kidnapped and repeatedly raped for a decade before their escape told her abductor Thursday that her life is just beginning while his is over now that he’s about to be sentenced to life in prison.

Michelle Knight stood just feet away from Ariel Castro in a Cleveland courtroom, the first time she’s been seen publicly since her rescue from the house where she was held captive.

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NPR Story
2:49 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

NSA And Aaron Swartz Hot Topics At Hacking Conferences

Army General Keith Alexander, head of the National Security Agency delivers a keynote address at the Black Hat hacker conference on Wednesday, July 31, 2013, in Las Vegas. (Isaac Brekken/AP)

Two tech conferences in Las Vegas — Def Con and Black Hat — have brought together hackers from all over the world.

Yesterday the director of the National Security Agency, Gen. Keith Alexander, spoke at Black Hat to a sometimes hostile crowd.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

E-Cigarettes Enjoy Perks Of Being Unregulated

Electronic cigarettes are no regulated by the FDA. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 11:38 am

Electronic cigarettes are a nicotine delivery system that has a small but growing share of the tobacco industry.

However, unlike chewing tobacco and traditional cigarettes, electronic cigarettes are not regulated by the FDA or any other body. That means that electronic cigarettes can advertise on television.

John Carroll, Here & Nows media analyst, fills us in on the growing trend.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Suicide Haunts New Generation Of Veterans

(sjbresnahan/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 2:49 pm

It’s estimated that more than 20 veterans kill themselves every day. A new survey of men and women who served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan shows that mental health is the most important issue they face.

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NPR Story
1:16 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Ohio Abortion Clinics Blame New Law For Closures

Toledo’s Center for Choice. (Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN)

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 2:49 pm

Abortion rights advocates in Ohio say a line item in the state budget passed in June is forcing abortion clinics to shut down.

The new regulation bans publicly-supported hospitals from having contracts known as “transfer agreements” with abortion clinics. But, without a “transfer agreement” the abortion clinics can’t do business with the hospital.

Two of Ohio’s 13 licensed abortion clinics have closed in recent weeks, and a third may have to shut down soon.

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NPR Story
1:50 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Gogol Bordello Goes Beyond Boundaries

Eugene Hütz is frontman of the band Gogol Bordello. (Gogol Bordello)

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 2:54 pm

The band Gogol Bordello has long been known for its high-energy live performances of their particular brand of gypsy punk rock in shows around the world.

On the band’s new album, “Pura Vida Conspiracy,” frontman Eugene Hütz declares that “borders are scars on the face of the planet.”

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NPR Story
1:50 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Rep. Amash On Reining In NSA Surveillance

Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., comments about the vote on the defense spending bill and his failed amendment that would have cut funding to the National Security Agency's program that collects the phone records of U.S. citizens and residents, at the Capitol, Wednesday, July 24, 2013. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

Republican Congressman Justin Amash, who represents Michigan’s 3rd district, is often called “the most defiant Republican in the House.”

He recently proposed and led the charge on the amendment that would have defunded the National Security Agency’s program of domestic surveillance.

That program was brought to light when Edward Snowden — the former N.S.A. contractor — leaked government documents to The Guardian and The Washington Post.

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NPR Story
1:50 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

U.S. Economy Grew At Sluggish 1.7 Percent Pace In Q2

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 2:54 pm

The U.S. economy grew from April through June at an annual rate of 1.7 percent – a sluggish pace but stronger than in the previous quarter. Businesses spent more, and the federal government cut less, offsetting weaker spending by consumers.

The government on Wednesday sharply revised down its estimate of growth in the January-March quarter to a 1.1 percent annual rate from a previously estimated 1.8 percent rate.

NPR’s Yuki Noguchi looks at how a low growth rate affects the entire economy, from the job market to home buying.

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