2018 Governor's Race

State Sen. Daniel Biss wants to beat Bruce Rauner in next year’s gubernatorial election. 

However, the Evanston Democrat doesn’t blame all of the state’s problems on the Republican incumbent. At a Champaign event, he said the Democrats who came before Rauner didn't fix what he considers an unfair tax system. 

Governor Bruce Rauner made Rockford one of the stops on his two-day trip across Illinois. He met with a large group made up mainly of his fellow Republican elected officials.

Rauner criticized Democrats in the state Legislature and blamed them for the budget stalemate. He urged them to make Illinois more business-friendly. He told reporters after the event, “I’ll judge myself by how strong the economy in Rockford grows over the next two and six years, while I am governor. And we need a strong economy for everybody in Illinois.”

A Democratic candidate for governor says he wants to help Illinois’ working class, particularly those living downstate.

Chicago Alderman Ameya Pawar’s priorities include a so-called “New Deal” for Illinois.  The idea is framed after President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s infrastructure projects that followed the Great Depression.

“I know right here in Peoria, there’s about a billion dollars worth of lock and dam work," he said. "So, we have an opportunity to not only build out our intermodal facilities, but also do ecological and wildlife restoration and lock and dam work.”

Democratic state Sen. Andy Manar says he will remain in the Illinois Senate rather than run for governor in 2018.

In an emailed statement Friday, the Bunker Hill resident says he plans to continue being "a strong voice for the citizens of Central Illinois" in the Legislature.

Manar was among several Democrats who said they were considering running against Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner.

Among those who've announced they're running are state Sen. Daniel Biss, businessman Chris Kennedy and Chicago Alderman Ameya Pawar.

flickr user Brett Levin "LEGAL Colorado Marijuana Grow" (CC BY 2.0) / http://bit.ly/1F0o4DW

Illinois' medical marijuana companies, operating in an industry abounding with rules, now have one less regulation they have to follow.

The Chicago Tribune reports that a federal judge ruled last week that a provision preventing cannabis companies from making campaign contributions in Illinois wasn't constitutional. The ruling was in response to a 2015 lawsuit filed by two Libertarian Party candidates who sought contributions from the medical marijuana industry.

Pages