abortion

Daisy Contreras/NPR Illinois

A measure that would allow taxpayer funding for abortions was sent to Gov. Bruce Rauner's desk today, and supporters want him to declare his support publicly before taking any further steps. 

In Rockford to visit a charter school Monday, Rauner again declined to reveal his specific position on the bill.

“There are passionate voices,” he said, “and I respect, frankly, both sides of the arguments. I am personally pro-choice, but I respect the moral arguments and the debate on the other side, and I am listening and we will make a decision in the near future."

A federal judge has ruled an Illinois law requiring hospital and medical clinic professionals to tell pregnant women about all their available options, including abortion, can't be enforced.

The Chicago Tribune reports U.S. District Court Judge Frederick Kapala  says that, until litigation is settled, the law shouldn't be enforced.

The Thomas More Society filed a lawsuit in March, targeting a provision added to the Health Care Right of Conscience Act last year that requires physicians to discuss all medical options available to patients.

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

A controversial measure approved Wednesday in the Illinois Senate would expand government funding of abortion to include state employees and lower-income women on government health plans.

It also would repeal a so-called “trigger” in state law which Democrats argue could automatically outlaw abortion should the 1973 Roe v. Wade U.S. Supreme Court decision ever be overturned.

Many Republicans found the expanded funding particularly objectionable.

"Money" By Flickr User Pictures of Money / (CC BY 2.0)

A Democratic lawmaker pushing legislation to remove prohibitions on publicly funded abortions in Illinois hopes to call it for a vote as thousands of women converge on the capital to lobby for a "progressive agenda."

Chicago Rep. Sara Feigenholtz's measure would lift restrictions on abortions funded by Medicaid or state employee health insurance.

She says the legislation also is important because it ensures abortion remains on the books in Illinois if the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing abortion is overturned.

Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner says he no longer supports expanding abortion coverage for state workers and Medicaid recipients because it's too controversial, and Illinois needs to focus on other issues such as creating jobs.

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