abortion

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois

Illinois gubernatorial candidates will soon receive a written pledge in the mail asking them to support the new law expanding abortion coverage — and oppose any push to repeal it.

After Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner signed a law providing abortion coverage under state health insurance and Medicaid, some — like state Rep. Jeanne Ives who ran against him on the GOP ticket in the primary — said it showed Rauner’s position on the issue is too liberal. According to Ives, the governor's decision encouraged her to run as his opponent. 

Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Commentary: Insights from the 2018 primary election

"Is this embattled Republican governor toast?" -- Natasha Korecki, Politico

"Is Gov. Bruce Rauner a lame duck limping?" -- Chuck Sweeny, Rockford Register Star

Alisa Ryan/Flickr

Anti-abortion advocates made their initial appearance in a Springfield courtroom yesterday.

They’re challenging a new Illinois law that will allow state money to pay for some abortions. It applies to women who have health insurance through state employment, as well as those on the Medicaid program. Lawyer Peter Breen says their case is about how state tax money is spent — not whether abortion is right or wrong.

Daisy Contreras/NPR Illinois

A measure that would allow taxpayer funding for abortions was sent to Gov. Bruce Rauner's desk today, and supporters want him to declare his support publicly before taking any further steps. 

In Rockford to visit a charter school Monday, Rauner again declined to reveal his specific position on the bill.

“There are passionate voices,” he said, “and I respect, frankly, both sides of the arguments. I am personally pro-choice, but I respect the moral arguments and the debate on the other side, and I am listening and we will make a decision in the near future."

A federal judge has ruled an Illinois law requiring hospital and medical clinic professionals to tell pregnant women about all their available options, including abortion, can't be enforced.

The Chicago Tribune reports U.S. District Court Judge Frederick Kapala  says that, until litigation is settled, the law shouldn't be enforced.

The Thomas More Society filed a lawsuit in March, targeting a provision added to the Health Care Right of Conscience Act last year that requires physicians to discuss all medical options available to patients.

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