abortion law

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

A controversial measure approved Wednesday in the Illinois Senate would expand government funding of abortion to include state employees and lower-income women on government health plans.

It also would repeal a so-called “trigger” in state law which Democrats argue could automatically outlaw abortion should the 1973 Roe v. Wade U.S. Supreme Court decision ever be overturned.

Many Republicans found the expanded funding particularly objectionable.

"Blake Wilbur Building - Stanford Hospital & Clinics" by Flickr User Jennifer Morrow / (CC X 2.0)

An anti-abortion physician and two pregnancy help centers have filed a lawsuit alleging an Illinois law requiring them to discuss abortion with patients is unconstitutional.

The Thomas More Society filed the lawsuit Thursday in U.S. District Court in Springfield. It targets a provision lawmakers added last year to the Health Care Right of Conscience Act. The law requires physicians to discuss all medical options available to patients.

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

New legislation would make the most dramatic changes since the 1970s to Illinois law dealing with abortion.

The prime target is a statute enacted after the U.S. Supreme Court’s Roe v Wade decision, which legalized abortion nationwide. State Rep. Sara Feigenholtz (D-Chicago) calls it the "trigger" law.

She says the administration of President Donald Trump is responsible for an awakening in women’s rights.