abortion law

State of Illinois

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner has signed the controversial House Bill 40, which allows the use of taxpayer funds to pay for abortions. He announced his intention at a news conference Thursday in Chicago and signed the bill later that day.

Daisy Contreras/NPR Illinois

A measure that would allow taxpayer funding for abortions was sent to Gov. Bruce Rauner's desk today, and supporters want him to declare his support publicly before taking any further steps. 

In Rockford to visit a charter school Monday, Rauner again declined to reveal his specific position on the bill.

“There are passionate voices,” he said, “and I respect, frankly, both sides of the arguments. I am personally pro-choice, but I respect the moral arguments and the debate on the other side, and I am listening and we will make a decision in the near future."

Gov. Rauner Remains Silent On State Abortion Bill

Sep 20, 2017
Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner says he will comment on an abortion bill once it reaches his desk.

House Bill 40 is designed to strengthen the state’s abortion law. Appearing on The 21st, Rauner only said, "That bill hasn’t been sent to my desk. They’re playing political games with it. I don’t really have any comment on it. We’ll talk about it at the appropriate time."

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

A controversial measure approved Wednesday in the Illinois Senate would expand government funding of abortion to include state employees and lower-income women on government health plans.

It also would repeal a so-called “trigger” in state law which Democrats argue could automatically outlaw abortion should the 1973 Roe v. Wade U.S. Supreme Court decision ever be overturned.

Many Republicans found the expanded funding particularly objectionable.

"Blake Wilbur Building - Stanford Hospital & Clinics" by Flickr User Jennifer Morrow / (CC X 2.0)

An anti-abortion physician and two pregnancy help centers have filed a lawsuit alleging an Illinois law requiring them to discuss abortion with patients is unconstitutional.

The Thomas More Society filed the lawsuit Thursday in U.S. District Court in Springfield. It targets a provision lawmakers added last year to the Health Care Right of Conscience Act. The law requires physicians to discuss all medical options available to patients.

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