ACA

Jenna Dooley

Healthcare leaders are voicing concerns about the Republican repeal plan to the Affordable Care Act.

Democrat Dick Durbin is traveling the state to meet with those who would be affected by the House changes.

Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Governor Bruce Rauner says Illinois wouldn’t do very well under congressional Republicans’ new health care proposal.

  

Some conservative groups have also criticized the House GOP's new plan to replace the Affordable Care Act.

Rauner says he plans to talk to members of Congress and other governors about how to change the proposal.

“I want to make sure people in Illinois are not left in the lurch or that there’s a lot of pressure to reduce insurance coverage for people in Illinois,” Rauner said.

"Wheelchair" by Flickr User zeevveez / (CC X 2.0)

Illinois U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin had harsh words Monday for Republican proposals in Congress to repeal Obamacare and give states more responsibility in running Medicaid.

President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan have both said they’re in favor of so-called block grants; it would transform Medicaid into a system where each state receives a bulk payment from the federal government to pay for healthcare for the poor, elderly and disabled.

That means each state would have to figure out its own how to direct that money and what services to provide.

Flickr user Michael Chen "Pills" (CC BY 2.0) bit.ly/1RgH2Na

An Illinois law that takes effect January first guarantees contraceptive coverage free of co-pays.

The federal Affordable Care Act already provides for that, but some insurers have managed to skirt requirements and have not covered all methods of birth control, according to Representative Elaine Nekritz. 

The Northbrook Democrat sponsored that law the Governor signed over the summer.

“The legislation would also allow and in fact require that a woman could get 12 months of contraception in one visit to the pharmacy,” Nekritz said.

"Electronic Stethescope" By Flickr User Ted Eytan / (CC BY 2.0)

An Illinois group is warning that if Obamacare is repealed without a replacement, there could be significant human and financial consequences.

President-elect Donald Trump and Congressional Republicans made repealing the Affordable Care Act a key plank in their campaigns.

That could be expensive, says Illinois Hospital Association president AJ Wilhelmi.

"Hospitals faced with cuts have tough decisions to make, and those decisions include laying off staff, reducing services, and putting projects on hold for infrastructure improvement,” Wilhelmi said.

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