Affordable Care Act

Flickr user / Images Money "Healthcare Costs" (CC BY 2.0)

Rockford residents who are getting their health insurance through the Illinois exchange under the current Affordable Care Act will lose an estimated average of $3,662 in subsidies under the proposed replacement American Health Care Act.

That’s a drop of more than 42 percent.

Moreover, Rockford would be the hardest-hit by the changes – and residents in only two other Illinois cities would see their subsidies shrink.

Jenna Dooley

Healthcare leaders are voicing concerns about the Republican repeal plan to the Affordable Care Act.

Democrat Dick Durbin is traveling the state to meet with those who would be affected by the House changes.

Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Governor Bruce Rauner says Illinois wouldn’t do very well under congressional Republicans’ new health care proposal.

  

Some conservative groups have also criticized the House GOP's new plan to replace the Affordable Care Act.

Rauner says he plans to talk to members of Congress and other governors about how to change the proposal.

“I want to make sure people in Illinois are not left in the lurch or that there’s a lot of pressure to reduce insurance coverage for people in Illinois,” Rauner said.

Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner said he doesn't support a repeal of Obamacare without a replacement.

It’s a rare comment from a governor who has stayed away from saying anything in public about national politics. But, as Republicans in Congress debate the issue with President-Elect Donald Trump, Rauner says he doesn’t support a simple repeal.

“I don’t think it works very well to just take it away and have nothing to replace it with," he said. "I don’t think that works.”

The Illinois Hospital Association says there could be significant fiscal and human consequences if Obamacare is repealed and there's no replacement plan.  

President-elect Donald Trump and Congressional Republicans made repealing the Affordable Care Act a key plank in their campaigns. IHA President A.J. Wilhelmi says that could be an expensive proposition.  

"Hospitals faced with cuts have tough decisions to make, and those decisions include laying off staff, reducing services, and putting projects on hold for infrastructure improvement."

Pages