Arts

Arts and culture

Jeffrey Curnow has a serious funny bone. In his cartoons, he pokes fun at symphony orchestras, conductors and musicians from his perch as the associate principal trumpeter of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

Flickr user Celeste Lindell / "Art supplies" (CC BY 2.0)

Teachers and administrators are working on new guidelines for art education in Illinois. Some schools have no art programs, while others have limited time to teach it.

New federal standards were released last year, though they came with no mandate. The State Board of Education has been organizing meetings for teachers to make the guidelines fit for them.

Jonathan VanderBrug is with Arts Alliance Illinois, an advocacy group that is also helping plan meetings. He says the process is meant to show schools why education in the arts is important.

Andris Nelsons, the Latvian conductor now in his second season as music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, has a taste for Russian music.

Guy Stephens / WNIJ

A nationally-recognized ensemble comes to Rockford for a performance this weekend.  It’s also one of the most unique.

It’s Friday night at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in Park Ridge, Illinois, and the St. Luke’s Bottle Band is rehearsing for its upcoming show at Rockford’s First Lutheran Church. 

It’s just one of many the band will give this year, adding to the hundreds the band has given over the past 35 years across the country, on TV and radio. 

Guy Stephens / WNIJ

A professional choir based at Northern Illinois University gives a concert Sunday, Oct. 18.  The ensemble gives both its director and its members a chance to go beyond the typical college or church choir experience.

Tigran Hamasyan won the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Piano Competition in 2006, but the music that resonates even deeper for him is centuries removed — and a sound world away — from jazz.

Daniel Ng "Room at Pudong Shangri-La, Shanghai / (CC by 2.0)

You're invited to a party at a wealthy person's home. Somehow, you find the master bathroom and stare at a mirror that appears to double as a medicine cabinet.

Do you open it?

Think about the things you can learn about your host just by taking a peek. Of course, there might be nothing more powerful or revealing than Tylenol in there. But you'll never know without opening it.

This is the premise for "Shattered," the final story of our "Three-Minute Fiction" contest.

Maria Boynton

After selecting the winners for our "Three-Minute Fiction" contest, our judge picked a handful of Honorable Mentions.

Pushcart Prize-winning author GK Wuori issued our prompt last month and chose his five favorite stories out of more than 100 submissions. We broadcast the winners during Morning Edition. Wouri then selected five other writers who also got to record their stories in our studios.

Here are our videos of the five Honorable Mention authors:

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