Arts

Arts and culture

Jim Mone/AP

It somehow just seems right the last A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor will be heard on this weekend of flags, parades, and lemonade stands. The show was recorded Friday night at the Hollywood Bowl.

The first Prairie Home Companion was in 1974, and all of us who share this sliver on the radio spectrum know we wouldn't be in business if Garrison Keillor hadn't made a new thing called public radio truly sing.

For this most American of holidays, how do we define our music? What makes it uniquely American?

In 1929 George Gershwin wrote that it's "something deeply rooted in our soil." Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Music Director Marin Alsop said, "It's highly energized, rhythmic music derived from the blurring of lines between popular and serious styles."

Carl Nelson

He's baaack -- with a beer in one hand and an iPhone in the other, getting an earful of political opinions.

The band Winger is perhaps best remembered for its late 1980s rock anthems, like "Seventeen." Its musicians could play. They wrote catchy songs, and of course, they had the hair. MTV viewers ate it up.

"Me being the Peter Pan of rock that I was, doing double pirouettes with my bass and you know, a real ham in the camera, it took off," says Kip Winger, the group's lead singer and bassist, who formed the band after touring with Alice Cooper in the late '80s.

Jeff Bossert / Illinois Public Radio

One of the biggest show business names to come out of Illinois is back home for a couple days with hopes of nurturing more talent, and making sure he always has a place to call home. 

In his first return home in 12 years, Van Dyke rolled up in a replica of the car he drove in the 1968 movie musical, “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.” The 90-year-old entertainer was welcomed by the Danville High School show choir, which will be performing with him Friday night.

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