Arts

Deceptive Cadence
2:51 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

First Watch: Finding Stillness In The Heart Of The City

courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun April 29, 2012 6:40 pm

A meditation on quietude amidst unceasing movement, a thick-walled cell of solitary contentment in the churn of daily life: That's the premise of this new video featuring the gifted pianist Michael Mizrahi.

Read more
Live in Concert
1:27 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Nashville Symphony Goes Electric, Eclectic

The Nashville Symphony with Music Director Giancarlo Guerrero (center) during Spring For Music at Carnegie Hall in Manhattan, New York on May 12, 2012.
Melanie Burford NPR

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 2:49 pm

PROGRAM

  • Ives: Universe Symphony (real. Austin)
  • Riley: The Palmian Chord Ryddle
  • Grainger: The Warriors
Read more
Classics in Concert
1:27 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Spring For Music: The Houston Symphony's Subversive, Sardonic Shostakovich

The Houston Symphony and conductor Hans Graf presented an all-Shostakovich evening for their evening at the Spring for Music festival at Carnegie Hal on May 7, 2012. They played two rarely heard works in powerful performances: the bitingly satirical Anti-Formalist Rayok, with soloist Mikhail Svetlov (pictured), as well as the gargantuan Symphony No. 11.
Torsten Kjellstrand Torsten Kjellstrand for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 2:48 pm

PROGRAM

  • SHOSTAKOVICH Anti-Formalist Rayok
  • SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 11 in G Minor, Op. 103, "The Year 1905"
  • Encore: LIADOV Baba Yaga
Read more
Deceptive Cadence
4:48 pm
Wed April 25, 2012

Talk Like An Opera Geek: Game-Changing Composers In Postwar Europe

György Ligeti's surreal opera Le Grand Macabre was the hit of the New York Philharmonic's 2009-2010 season, in a semi-staged production that featured Barbara Hannigan (left) as Gepopo and Anthony Roth Costanzo as Prince Go-Go.
Chris Lee New York Philharmonic

Talk Like An Opera Geek attempts to decode the intriguing and intimidating lexicon of the opera house.

Although a few radical composers had no use for opera in the mid-20th century (like Pierre Boulez, who infamously advocated blowing up the world's opera houses), the art form in Europe brushed itself off and began to thrive again after World War II.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
2:58 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

Bang On A Concerto: A New Percussion Piece By Rautavaara

Einojuhani Rautavaara, the elder statetsman of Finnish composers, has written a dynamic percussion concerto for Colin Currie.
Sakari Viika Ondine Records

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 3:09 pm

Pity the poor percussionist in Mozart's day. He didn't have much to do in the orchestra, save for the occasional punctuating roll of the kettledrum (usually supporting a burst of brass) or the rare ping of a triangle.

Read more
Music Interviews
2:02 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

Classical 'Rock Star' Joshua Bell Takes On Conducting

Joshua Bell.
Ethan Miller Getty Images for The Smith Center

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 4:17 pm

Joshua Bell, the violin prodigy who grew into what some call a classical-music rock star, has taken the helm of the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. Bell is the orchestra's first music director since Sir Neville Marriner, who created the group.

On his first tour with the group as both music director and conductor, Bell plays the violin while conducting the orchestra simultaneously, gesturing with his bow. And he leads from the concert master's chair, rather than the podium, which seems unusual to some audiences.

Read more
The Record
9:12 am
Mon April 23, 2012

Eulogy For A Record Store

The Melody Records storefront in February.
Tom Cole NPR

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 9:01 am

How do you measure the value of an experience — one that promises the thrill of new discoveries; the chance to experience, at least vicariously, foreign cultures, new ideas, unexpected emotions — and, at least for a moment, escape? What's that worth?

Probably more than words can express — whatever experience those questions might conjure for you. For me, they're prompted by the loss of an experience — of going to a record store.

Melody Records, on Connecticut Avenue in Washington, D.C., closed on March 9,2012, after 35 years in business.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
9:10 am
Mon April 23, 2012

The Tokyo String Quartet Will Bid Farewell

Christian Ducasse courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 4:01 pm

It's time to say goodbye: After more than 40 years, the members of Tokyo String Quartet have decided they will disband at the end of the 2012-13 season.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
3:11 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: April 20, 2012

Composer Meredith Monk.
courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 4:16 pm

  • Twenty-one American performing artists, including composer/singer/choreographer/force of nature Meredith Monk and clarinetist/composer Don Byron, have been named as part of the first class of
Read more
Deceptive Cadence
2:21 pm
Fri April 20, 2012

To Russia, With Musical Love — After 22 Years' Absence

An advertisement in Moscow for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's first concerts in Russia in more than two decades.
Todd Rosenberg Courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 5:06 pm

This week, music is bringing Americans and Russians together in a way that policy discussions never can. And don't call that a cliche in front of the music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

If U.S. relations with Russia have hit a sticky patch over Syria and other issues lately, that didn't stop the Chicago Symphony from thrilling a Russian audience this past Wednesday night, just as it did on its last visit — to the then-Soviet Union in 1990.

Read more

Pages