Arts

NPR Jazz Live
11:59 am
Fri January 13, 2012

Vijay Iyer Trio: Live In Concert

The Vijay Iyer Trio performs at Le Poisson Rouge for the NYC Winter Jazzfest on Saturday, Jan. 7.
John Rogers for NPR johnrogersnyc.com

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 8:32 am

Pianist and composer Vijay Iyer leads a trio that traffics in grooves, crackling and heavy. He has a distinctive way of exploiting dissonance and rhythmic space at the piano; he's joined by a deeply resonant, gut-punching bassist (Stephan Crump) and a drummer with an advanced understanding of time (Marcus Gilmore). The results are beats that feel borrowed from a future age; alternately, they're new lenses on jazz's big-picture history.

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Field Recordings
11:57 am
Fri January 13, 2012

Gil Shaham: A Violinist's Day At The Museum

Gil Shaham Field Recording at Hirshhorn Museum
Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 10:20 am

By Amanda Ameer

As Gil Shaham wandered through the back offices of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., he said he felt "like Ben Stiller in Night at the Museum." For this impromptu Bach mini-recital, the violin superstar momentarily became part of the art, bathed in the modish lighting and projections of a multimedia installation during the performance.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:25 pm
Wed January 11, 2012

My Holidays With Loriot

German comedian Loriot.
Flickr Creative Commons

Originally published on Wed January 11, 2012 1:16 pm

Before I touched down in Germany for another Christmas and New Year's with my wife's family, I had never heard of Bernard Victor Christoph Carl von Bülow.

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Deceptive Cadence
8:06 am
Wed January 11, 2012

Janáček For Voices: The Choral Side Of An Unusual Composer

A new album by Cappella Amsterdam explores rarely performed choral music by Leos Janáček.
Marco Borggreve Harmonia Mundi

Originally published on Tue January 10, 2012 3:00 pm

There was nothing ordinary about Czech composer Leos Janáček. He set one opera in a barnyard and another on the moon. He fell for a married woman more than 30 years his junior, proceeding to write more than 700 love letters. And in his mid-60s, he churned out piece after amazing piece in one of classical music's most impressive late surges.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:35 pm
Mon January 9, 2012

Pianist Alexis Weissenberg Dies At 82

Alexis Weissenberg's skill at playing Schubert on the accordion saved his life during World War II.
Patrick Kovarik AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 31, 2012 8:51 am

The Bulgarian-born pianist Alexis Weissenberg, whose musical talent as a youngster probably saved his life and that of his mother, died Sunday at age 82.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:37 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: January 6, 2012

This is all that remains of a violin PayPal asked a buyer to destroy.
Regretsy.com

Originally published on Fri January 6, 2012 2:04 pm

  • Paypal has confirmed a story that seemed at first to be too wild to be true: They told a customer to destroy a violin after a contentious eBay transaction. The instrument's provenance was disputed (though incorrect labels aren't exactly uncommon in the violin world).
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Deceptive Cadence
2:27 pm
Wed January 4, 2012

The Takacs Quartet's Haydn: Brilliant, But With A Bite

The Takacs Quartet, continuing to conquer the music of "Papa" Haydn.
Ellen Appel courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Tue January 3, 2012 12:53 pm

For string quartet lovers, a new release by the Takács Quartet is always reason to celebrate. In recent years, their vividly intense recordings of Schubert, Schumann and Brahms, not to mention Bartok and Beethoven, have continued to garner the huge acclaim that has become the nearly default critical response over some three decades.

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Opinion
3:51 pm
Mon January 2, 2012

Poetic Perfection: Three Favorite Poems Of 2011

istockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon January 2, 2012 6:00 am

David Lehman is a poet and the series editor for The Best American Poetry series.

Three of my favorite poems of 2011 share a sense of mystery and the uncanny – a spooky but also exhilarating glimpse of a spiritual world beyond our own. All favor plain speech, an unadorned directness, eschewing the glamour of rhyme or traditional form.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:15 pm
Fri December 30, 2011

Around The Classical Internet: December 30, 2011

Learning the conductorly art of shaping music with your body.
Andrei Tchernov iStock

Originally published on Fri December 30, 2011 3:09 pm

  • How exactly does a conductor conduct? New York magazine critic Justin Davidson steps on the podium to find out after an intensive fall of coaching by Alan Gilbert and James Ross who co-lead Juilliard's conducting program. "Lifting the baton feels a little like getting ready to push off from the top of a ski slope, in that I'll move in the right direction whatever I do, and also because fear will cause disaster. Neither fact is comforting."
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Tiny Desk Concerts
1:55 pm
Tue December 27, 2011

Maria Volonte: Tiny Desk Concert

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