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Flickr user Brent Hoard "ECU School of Education Class Room" (CC BY 2.0)

Illinois is almost six months behind in its obligation to give millions of dollars to school districts across the state for transportation, special education and other expenses.

The Herald & Review reports the stopgap spending deal Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and the Democratic-controlled Legislature struck over the summer authorized a full year's funding for elementary and secondary education, intending to spare public schools from the uncertainty plaguing other state operations, which were only funded for six months.

Jenna Dooley

Outgoing Illinois Comptroller Leslie Munger says lawmakers suing her to get back pay are ``cowards.''

The Republican was named in a Cook County lawsuit by six legislators Friday on her last day in office. The Democratic lawmakers haven't been paid since May and say Munger is violating the state Constitution by interfering in a separate branch of government.

Munger announced in April she would put lawmakers' paychecks in line with all other overdue bills until they reach a budget deal with Gov. Bruce Rauner.

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

Anxious legislators will once again see a deposit from the state of Illinois in their bank accounts. They’re getting paid tomorrow.

Illinois doesn’t have enough money in the bank to pay all of its own bills. As a result, the comptroller’s office is way behind paying businesses contracted to do work for the state.

The backlog of overdue bills is approaching $8 billion. A lot of money, to be sure.

But what does that even mean?

Maybe the best way to measure it: How often legislators themselves are getting paid.

Brian Mackey/Illinois Public Radio

Illinois's overdue bills are 16 percent higher than previously reported. They could top ten billion dollars by end of the fiscal year.

   

 

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Expect the state to be nine billion dollars behind in paying its bills by the end of the year. That was the grim message State Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka had for a gathering of not-for-profit agencies Monday at Rockford University. She’s enlisting their help to find ways to ease the financial pressure on groups that depend on state money to serve their clients. 

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