State of Illinois

Illinois is chasing a moving target as it tries to dig out of the nation's worst budget crisis, and $7.5 billion worth of unpaid bills hadn't even been sent to the official who writes the checks by the end of June.

The Associated Press obtained the review, conducted by Comptroller Susana Mendoza's office. Although many of those unprocessed bills have since been paid, the office says a similar amount have replaced them.

That's in addition to $9 billion worth of checks that are at the office but being delayed because the state lacks the money to pay them.

Flickr user Pictures of Money / "Money" (CC BY 2.0)

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner is authorizing a major borrowing plan to pay down part of the state’s nearly $15 billion dollar backlog of bills.

Lawmakers approved a state budget over Rauner’s veto earlier this summer, which called for borrowing $6 billion dollars.

Rauner waited about two months to authorize that borrowing, which racked up even more late fees for all the unpaid bills.

Rauner said in an interview that the budget is still not balanced, but he wants to bring discipline to the state’s finances.

Increased revenues coming in to state coffers during tax season have allowed the Illinois Comptroller to release more than $800 million in payments for health care services.

Comptroller Susana Mendoza said Wednesday that the money will go to nearly a dozen managed-care operations in Illinois serving Medicaid patients, according to the State Journal-Register.  Those organizations can use the money to pay doctors, hospitals and mental-health counselors.

Flickr user Brent Hoard "ECU School of Education Class Room" (CC BY 2.0)

Illinois is almost six months behind in its obligation to give millions of dollars to school districts across the state for transportation, special education and other expenses.

The Herald & Review reports the stopgap spending deal Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and the Democratic-controlled Legislature struck over the summer authorized a full year's funding for elementary and secondary education, intending to spare public schools from the uncertainty plaguing other state operations, which were only funded for six months.

Jenna Dooley

Outgoing Illinois Comptroller Leslie Munger says lawmakers suing her to get back pay are ``cowards.''

The Republican was named in a Cook County lawsuit by six legislators Friday on her last day in office. The Democratic lawmakers haven't been paid since May and say Munger is violating the state Constitution by interfering in a separate branch of government.

Munger announced in April she would put lawmakers' paychecks in line with all other overdue bills until they reach a budget deal with Gov. Bruce Rauner.